A Bunch of Jews (and other stuff)

A Bunch of Jews A Minyen Yidn is a collection of stories written in Yiddish in the 1930s adapted to an English graphic novel by Trina Robbins and a collection of artists including Willy Mendes, Steve Leialoha, Shary Flenniken, Eve Furchgott, Miriam Katin, Miriam Libicki, Sarah Glidden, Anne Timmons, Robert Triptow, Jen Vaughn, Elizabeth Watasin, Caryn Leschen, Joan SteacA Bunch of Jews A Minyen Yidn is a collection of stories written in Yiddish in the 1930s adapted to an English graphic novel by Trina Robbins and a collection of artists including Willy Mendes, Steve Leialoha, Shary Flenniken, Eve Furchgott, Miriam Katin, Miriam Libicki, Sarah Glidden, Anne Timmons, Robert Triptow, Jen Vaughn, Elizabeth Watasin, Caryn Leschen, Joan Steacy, Ken Steacy, and Terry Laban These are stories of jealous schoolteachers, yearning husbands, loyal pets, and all the emotional moments of friends and neighbours that make up a community Touching, funny, and heartfelt tributes to Jewish life in the early 1900s in Europe and USA.
A Bunch of Jews and other stuff A Bunch of Jews A Minyen Yidn is a collection of stories written in Yiddish in the s adapted to an English graphic novel by Trina Robbins and a collection of artists including Willy Mendes Steve

  • Title: A Bunch of Jews (and other stuff)
  • Author: Trina Robbins
  • ISBN: 9780993997051
  • Page: 262
  • Format: Paperback
  • Bunch Definition of Bunch by Merriam Webster Noun He always had a bunch of keys on his belt Dried herbs hung in bunches from the kitchen rafters. Verb The child s tights bunched at the ankles the dress bunches a bit at the waist

    1 thought on “A Bunch of Jews (and other stuff)”

    1. I have an ever-growing fascination with Yiddish literature thanks to my Ashkenazi roots, so I was ecstatic when I saw that Trina Robbins had adapted her father's A Minyen Yidn un Andere Zakhn into comic form.This collection of engaging and humane short stories, featuring different sets of illustrators for each one, of arrogant schoolteachers, boastful travelers, stingy merchants, adoring pets, and all the disasters and triumphs that can happen to families and tight-knit communities. “It’s [...]

    2. 'A Bunch of Jews (and other stuff)' by Trina Robbins is an adaptation of a book her father wrote in Yiddish in the 1930s called A Minyen Yidn. An introduction by Robbins talks about how the book was found by her daughter. It is translated here in English and illustrated into graphic novel form by a series of artists including Ken and Joan Steacy, Jen Vaughn, Steve Lealoah, Anne Timmons and others.Many of the stories are about a shtetl in what is Belarus called Duboy. The stories are about stern [...]

    3. If you are only familiar with Sholom Aleichem and Fiddler on the Roof, this might be a good book to expand your horizons on. This book was originally written in Yiddish, by the father of Trina Robbins, of Underground Comic and Wonder Woman fame. As she said in the introduction, when her father wrote this, she wanted nothing to do with the book, Yiddish was old-fashioned, and she wanted nothing to do with that world.Than, years later, she not only embraced the book, got it translated, and heald a [...]

    4. Check out my book blog for more book reviews and other bookish posts!I received an ARC of A Bunch of Jews (and other stuff) from Netgalley. I was interested in seeing a collection of stories was going to be conveyed in graphic novel style. I also liked the idea of reading about Jewish everyday life.This book is #ownvoices for Jewish representation.__The author’s note is fascinating, as she explains what the book her father, Perlson, had written meant to her when she was younger and what it mea [...]

    5. Guys, I love yiddish storytelling. I love it even more in comic book form. Hence, I loved this. It's not bold or brilliant or super-showy off-y, it's just a nice, sort of cranky set of tales from Robbins' papa's old shtetl, brought to life by other Jewish cartoons. 2 Miriams! Sarah Glidden! Everything is wonderful. I just wish there was more.

    6. Most of what I got from these pages was due to the visuals, and the many different monochrome drawing styles (love the nod to Will Eisner I found from Steve Leialoha). What that means is I didn't find much favour with the stories themselves, which is not to say they're bad, but they definitely had the air of meaning more to an actual Jewish audience.

    7. The story of Feydo almost made me cry! I admit I didn't "get" all of these stories, I think they are very specific to Eastern European Ashkenazi Jewish culture/mindsets, which is not a problem, and they are definitely stories worth telling, but I think I need to expand my knowledge of 19th/early 20th century Jewish culture to fully understand and appreciate the stories. I am definitely not the target audience for this book, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. The artwork is great, and I really feel li [...]

    8. For me, this was a book of two parts. I adored the front cover and the wonderful illustrations inside, but didn't always 'get' all of the stories. Some I found much more enjoyable than others. Having read the background at the beginning of the book, I'm so very pleased that this work was rediscovered by the writer's family and to the Jewish world and it would make a great addition to any Jewish home library, my own included. Many thanks to Netgalley who provided me with this ARC. I chose to read [...]

    9. The illustrations are wonderful. Most notable is the cover art by Willy Mendes. The translated text often leaves much to be desired. Much of the translation seems to be way too literal while losing the essence of what is being said. I was puzzled by two references to Christmas. The first referred to Christmas shopping; while the illustration clearly showed a menorah on display behind a salesperson. Having said all this, I am glad I got it and read it. I'd even recommend itwith my caveats.

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