The Pharmacist's Wife

Love Desire Vengeance A deadly alchemy.When Rebecca Palmer s new husband opens a pharmacy in Victorian Edinburgh, she expects to live the life of a well heeled gentlewoman But her ideal is turns to ashes when she discovers her husband is not what he seems As Rebecca struggles to maintain her dignity in the face of his infidelity and strange sexual desires, Alexander tLove Desire Vengeance A deadly alchemy.When Rebecca Palmer s new husband opens a pharmacy in Victorian Edinburgh, she expects to live the life of a well heeled gentlewoman But her ideal is turns to ashes when she discovers her husband is not what he seems As Rebecca struggles to maintain her dignity in the face of his infidelity and strange sexual desires, Alexander tries to pacify her so called hysteria with a magical new chemical creation A wonder drug he calls heroin Rebecca s journey into addiction takes her further into her past, and her first, lost love, while Alexander looks on, curiously observing his wife s descent Meanwhile, Alexander s desire to profit from his invention leads him down a dangerous path that blurs science, passion, and death He soon discovers that even the most promising experiments can have unforeseen and deadly consequencesReminiscent of the works of Sarah Waters, this is a brilliantly observed piece of Victoriana which deals with the disempowerment of women, addiction, desire, sexual obsession and vengeance.
The Pharmacist s Wife Love Desire Vengeance A deadly alchemy When Rebecca Palmer s new husband opens a pharmacy in Victorian Edinburgh she expects to live the life of a well heeled gentlewoman But her ideal is turns to as

  • Title: The Pharmacist's Wife
  • Author: Vanessa Tait
  • ISBN: 9781786492715
  • Page: 254
  • Format: None
  • 1 thought on “The Pharmacist's Wife”

    1. I loved my visit to Victorian Edinburgh in the company of The Pharmacists wife. I love books set in this era, I love Edinburgh and I really enjoy books which remind me how grateful I am to be a woman in the noughties and how very different life must have been for my contemporaries around 150 years ago.Rebecca's only chance to make a life for herself lies in marriage, albeit not to the man she loved and lost years ago, but a practical arrangement as wife to Alexander, a handsome and respectable p [...]

    2. I really enjoyed this book, and have put it up there as one of my favourite books 2018. I know we are not yet finished January but I know when I love a book, and this one I didn’t just love, but I devoured.Set in Victorian Edinburgh, which always excites me as I am from Edinburgh, recently married Rebecca Palmer is adjusting to married life with her pharmacist husband Alexander. When Alexander begins administering her daily salts to calm her ‘hysteria1 Rebecca begins a horrible descent into [...]

    3. I don't read a lot of Victorian based historical fiction, though admittedly it is loosely based on historical fact, as a result I found this an interesting read but I also struggled at the same time because the writing sometimes failed to engage me. The story itself is based around Rebecca, a lady approaching her 30's and is considering herself 'past it' (oh dear god no, that means I'm screwed then!) so marries the first eligible man to come along so she can be saved from spinsterhood. What foll [...]

    4. The Pharmacist’s Wife is an atmospheric piece of historical fiction about female empowerment, manipulation, and addiction, set in Victorian Edinburgh. Rebecca Palmer’s husband Alexander opens a pharmacy and dreams of dreams of success with his new chemical invention: heroin. At the same time, he claims that it is the perfect cure for Rebecca’s hysteria, but the drug reminds her of her lost first love and draws her into a friendship that will reveal all her husband’s sexual secrets. Soon, [...]

    5. Edinburgh. 1869. Rebecca is newly married to respectable pharmacist Alexander, full of hope and anticipation for the joyful future and genteel status the union promises. But Alexander's dark desires and darker yet plans for his new wife will threaten Rebecca's happiness, health - and her lifeThe Pharmacist's Wife is a tale of high and low life in Victorian Edinburgh - one of the world's most beautiful cities and, in the nineteenth century, one of the most dangerous. The bright, wholesome facades [...]

    6. was asked to review this by LovereadingComing from Edinburgh - the fact this is set in Victorian Edinburgh Not only can I imagine the scenes, but it is an apt place to set this historical fiction story. When I walk in the dark streets I can sense the atmosphere of that time.This has addiction, Heroin (deadly in the wrong hands) female empowerment and male domination at a time if women had problems it was probably "hysteria" apparently in 1859 one physician (male) stated one quarter of women suff [...]

    7. Alexander Palmer has chosen a wife; a compliant young lady upon whom he can experiment with his new invention, heroin. Rebecca Palmer is not the retiring young woman her husband thought she was and, despite being heavily dosed up with "medicine" she sets out to show him what she's really made of.I really liked the idea of this novel when I read the precis and was looking forward to reading it, thinking it would be full of Victorian intrigue and Dickensian characters. Unfortunately, there were no [...]

    8. When Alexander opens his new pharmacy, things look rosy for him and his new wife Rebecca. But all is not as it seems.This was a delicious tale. Love, desire,vengeance are all present. Also throw in drug addiction and you have a deadly alchemy. Set in Victorian Edinburgh this is a gothic tale. Where men rule and women are mere chattels .They are expected to obey men in all they say and subvert their own opinions and beliefs to the male of the species. A story that entertains, grips and has reader [...]

    9. I really enjoyed the Pharmacists Wife. It was a thrilling, dark psychological study into drug addiction set in Victorian Edinburgh. I rushed through the first two thirds as of watching a car crash, but then it all concluded in a largely believable fashion. The characters were well developed but I’m not sure how authentic the ending was considering it was set in 1869. That said, I didn’t want it to end and really enjoyed it.

    10. Lazy Sunday morning I thought “I’ll read a few pages”.250 pages later and I’m devouring this bookOne of the best books I’ve read in ages, so much so I reckon it would make a great movie, I’m working on the cast!

    11. I really wanted to like this book but I just couldn't engage with the writing properly. I didnt warm to any of the characters and found myself not caring what happened.

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