Jane Austen and Crime

Susannah Fullerton has brilliantly hit on the theme of crime andpunishment in Jane Austen s work Fullerton shows how the Regencyworld was really a dangerous place with a fast rising crime rate and alegal system that handed out ferocious sentences Her book will beessential reading for every Janeite.
Jane Austen and Crime Susannah Fullerton has brilliantly hit on the theme of crime andpunishment in Jane Austen s work Fullerton shows how the Regencyworld was really a dangerous place with a fast rising crime rate and ale

  • Title: Jane Austen and Crime
  • Author: Susannah Fullerton
  • ISBN: 9780976353959
  • Page: 295
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Jane Austen and Crime”

    1. What I found most valuable in this book was Fullerton's references to seemingly small and unimportant details in Austen's novels, which would have been significant to her contemporaries. For example, when Harriet is accosted by gypsies I understood that it was very unpleasant to be surrounded and perhaps robbed--as i have been myself--but I did not know that it was illegal to speak to gypsies (recall, she pled with them). The chapter on prostitution notes that Mrs. Clay's lotion for clearing up [...]

    2. Regency life was not as pretty as it looks in the films of Jane Austen's books. Prisoners were transported to Australia or left to bide their time on crowded, disease-ridden prison ships in the Thames, while poachers -- many of them poor people who were starving because of the Enclosure laws -- were heavily fined. Talking to gypsies was a hanging offense, and much of England's tea was obtained from smugglers. A fresh and lively perspective on Austen's world.

    3. 3.5 stars. Some aspects of this book were fantastic. I loved how much information it gave me about life and crime during the time period. As one example, I never knew how badly Attorney's were looked down on, and that knowledge makes the part in Pride and Prejudice all the better. Sometimes there are some long-drawn bows to connect the crimes with Austen novels (the Persuasion link with suicide in particular comes to mind) but overall very informative.

    4. This is not the most exciting book in the world, but it was an interesting look at criminal actions and the way they were evolving during Jane Austen's lifetime. Fullerton supports her views from Austen's fiction and letters. In some cases, she makes suppositions based on actions of Jane's immediate family.

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