The Great Fire of London

Synopsis Peter Ackroyd often takes an historical event or period and reinterprets it in light of a modern one In his first novel, which is essentially a rewrite of LITTLE DORRIT, Ackroyd s story involves a modern filmmaker with the very literary name of Spenser Spender who is trying to make a film of Dickens s novel, set in a London prison The project becomes theSynopsis Peter Ackroyd often takes an historical event or period and reinterprets it in light of a modern one In his first novel, which is essentially a rewrite of LITTLE DORRIT, Ackroyd s story involves a modern filmmaker with the very literary name of Spenser Spender who is trying to make a film of Dickens s novel, set in a London prison The project becomes the focus of the interests of a colorful and very Dickensian collection of characters As in all Ackroyd s novels, his first effort makes the city of London into something like a major character in the tale.
The Great Fire of London Synopsis Peter Ackroyd often takes an historical event or period and reinterprets it in light of a modern one In his first novel which is essentially a rewrite of LITTLE DORRIT Ackroyd s story invol

  • Title: The Great Fire of London
  • Author: Peter Ackroyd
  • ISBN: 9780226002644
  • Page: 405
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Great Fire of London ”

    1. I wanted to enjoy this more than I did. There's no question that it's intelligently written and some of it is beautifully phrased. The characters in the story all link in some way to Dickens' Little Dorrit but I don't think it matters if you've read it before reading this. I hadn't. Halfway through, I began to be bored by the characters, quite annoyed by some actually, and started to wonder just what the point of the story is. Eventually I lost patience and hurried through to the end. It's the f [...]

    2. Well to tell you the truth, I expected something else entirely. This book loosely brings together several characters and binds them to Dickens. The characters sadly didn't grip me the way Ackroyd's creations normally do, most of them actually annoyed me. Sorry to say, but this book just wasn't my cup of tea.

    3. I read this just after reading Little Dorrit, which I had read while visiting London and staying in Southwark. It was fun as a “place” book (as is Little Dorrit) and was frequently witty and amusing, but for the most part I found it rather plodding.

    4. THIS IS NOT NON-FICTION.I was led astray. I wouldn't call it *enjoyable*- none of the characters are really developed or likable and the story is fairly flat- but it is a very quick read and one can see the outlines of an author who is about to come into his own.

    5. Peter Ackroyd's first novel. It revolves around Dickens, and London past and present - themes that continue to recur in Ackroyd's work. A lot of interesting characters and possibilities, but the narrative lacked in pace and density. A promising rather than accomplished debut. His next novel, THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF OSCAR WILDE is an exponential improvement.

    6. London in the 1980s with a few characters who are introduced in the beginning in short chapters and ultimately come together in a fire at a prison. This was Ackroyd's first novel. Thought it was historical, but was wrong. A VERY quick read.

    7. A bit of an odd onebut find I a lot of Ackroyd's books like that. But they are so intriguing. Apparently, Ackroyd is not a fan of his first novel, which I find surprising, but perhaps it's not that unusual. Now I want to read Hawksmoor

    8. It's difficult to read an unimpressive book by an author you admire but I see how this early effort by Ackroyd led him to some of his more creative works. I found this one dry and without a satisfactory conclusion.

    9. Fictionalised account of the great fire of London. Not too bad, but also not really all that good, or so I thought.

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