A Few Good Men

This Broadway hit about the trial of two Marines for complicity in the death of a fellow Marine at Guantanamo Bay sizzles on stage The Navy lawyer, a callow young man interested in softball games than the case, expects a plea bargain and a cover up of what really happened Prodded by a female member of his defense team, the lawyer eventually makes a valiant effort toThis Broadway hit about the trial of two Marines for complicity in the death of a fellow Marine at Guantanamo Bay sizzles on stage The Navy lawyer, a callow young man interested in softball games than the case, expects a plea bargain and a cover up of what really happened Prodded by a female member of his defense team, the lawyer eventually makes a valiant effort to defend his clients and, in so doing, puts the military mentality and the Marine code of honor on trial.
A Few Good Men This Broadway hit about the trial of two Marines for complicity in the death of a fellow Marine at Guantanamo Bay sizzles on stage The Navy lawyer a callow young man interested in softball games than

  • Title: A Few Good Men
  • Author: Aaron Sorkin
  • ISBN: 9780573692000
  • Page: 348
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “A Few Good Men”

    1. It's a lot of fun to go back and see the source material for some of my favorite movies. This play would go on to become the Tom Cruise/Jack Nicholson movie and to launch Aaron Sorkin's career.Some of the best Sorkin-style dialog started here, and it's a joy to imagine the intricate staging described in the play. However, the plot, characters and dialog were all tightened up for the movie, and it is simply better.Still, for this fan, reading this was almost like seeing an alternate "director's c [...]

    2. Read this for school and in the beginning honestly wasn't exactly sure what to think. By our third day of reading and discussing it was starting to grow on me. By the end of the first act, I didn't want the bell to ring. 4 stars due to the slower start in my opinion. Characters are written beautifully, Jo especially! You either love them or want them dead.

    3. Aron Sorkin's script depicts a struggle for honour, loyalty, and truth among Marines once a member of their unit is killed on the base at Guantanamo Bay. Sorkin uses quick wit and passionate discussion to portray the two sides of a divided branch of lawyers attempting to prove that not all situations are black and white decisions ,are by the perpetrators.Any fan of Sorkin's television productions will recognise certain recurring themes and familiar lines found in everything from Sports Night and [...]

    4. Aaron Sorkin is a phenomenal writer, but as with any human being, he has his limitations. This has become regrettably clear of late with The Newsroom: a show that spent much of its runtime brushing uncomfortably against those personal boundaries. His treatment of his women characters was troubling in a seemingly oblivious, unconscious way. Meanwhile, the "here's how it should be" moral high ground that worked so wonderfully in The West Wing felt progressively preachier the further it stepped fro [...]

    5. Investigative journalist Nick Davies has chosen to discuss Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's All the President’s Men, on FiveBooks as one of the top five on his subject - Investigative Journalism, saying that:“What is so good about All the President’s Men is that most books about journalists are full of gun fights and car chases – but that’s just not what the job involves. Woodward and Bernstein simply wrote a great, really detailed account of the work that went into the case. I still [...]

    6. Having enjoyed the movie, I was expecting a bit better from the original play. However, the play is an almost incoherent mish-mash. The author clearly knew nothing about the Navy or Marine Corps and tossed in terminology that sounded "military". As a small example, could Sorkin not even have taken the trouble to realize that there is no such transport aircraft as an AF-40? I'm not as well versed on the trial side of the house, but my JAG friends tell me that the court-martial was also a dog's br [...]

    7. Not what I would call a "good" play. Sorkin left in a lot of extraneous dialogue, and scripted some really unrealistic situations (there's a scene in which Daniel Kaffee actually punches Harrold Dawson in the stomach(!)). Still, I'm impressed that what must surely have been a controversial piece of work ever made it to the stage, let alone into a screenplay. Also, on a personal note, I think it's spooky that I was motivated to read this on the exact night that the infamous William Santiago was m [...]

    8. If you've seen the film then you've more or less experienced the play, though the famous "You can't handle the truth" comes off as less embellished in this version, but perhaps that's due to the lack of Jack Nicholson. Featuring Sorkin's now well known and equally respected rat-a-tat dialogue, it's an interesting book to look back on considering this is what brought him to such prominence. Even at the beginning of his career, he demonstrates an ability for showcasing language's great beauty.

    9. What I like about this play is that the characters are created only out of their dialogue, there is minimal stage direction, sets or notes on what the playwright is looking for in the performance. For example in many Tennessee Williams or Arther Miller plays they have lengthy character explanations and notes on what feeling the play should have, not that that's a bad thing, but I like how A Few Good Men is just pulled forward by the character and their dialog colliding.

    10. The first read through took me a while, probably because I was memorizing parts as I went instead of reading straight through first. It many scenes it is essentially identical to the movie. There are a few scenes where there are some additionsd probably some subtractions but those were less noticeable.I enjoyed that there isn't really a break between scenes and that they seamlessly flow from one into the next as the lights rise and fall on different parts of the stage.

    11. I remember reading this well before the movie came out. I was part of a theater company that was comprised of seven men and one woman, so I was reading lots of plays with male-heavy casts. This had been highly recommended to me and I just thought it was "eh." Felt pretty much the same about the movie when it came out.

    12. The original play by Aaron Sorkin before the screenplay and film. Amazing to see this master's early work. e.g. "You can't handle the truth!" is trampled over, buried deep in a monologue. Not the classic line it developed into for the film but as a setup for Kaffee to pay off later. "That's the truth isn't it colonel? I can handle it."

    13. So much of the dialogue is the same as the movie. You can't but help picture all those actors in these roles. I did not like the ending dialogue between Dawson and Downey at the end. It made it seem like they learned nothing. Glad the movie made a change in that area.

    14. I like the movie better, but they followed the script pretty closely, so it's basically the same thing. I'd love to see this acted out on stage, though I'd have a hard time picture any other actors playing the parts. How do you compete with Jack Nicholson?

    15. Did this as a production in an old historic courthouse where I live. Members of the audience were invited to sit in the jury box. It was a good show and a unique setting.

    16. You can tell that this was written by a screenwriter, but more importantly, by an amazing storyteller. Sorkin did it again! I'd love to see this up on its feet.

    17. Inevitably gets compared with the (excellent) film, and probably falls just short of it. Brisk and witty, but still tense - typical Sorkin.

    18. I read this for class, and I'm glad I did, because it was certainly thought provoking. Not great literature, but not supposed to be

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