War, Women, and the News: How Female Journalists Won the Battle to Cover World War II

When war broke out in Europe in 1939, American women had no way of knowing how much the next six years would change their lives The beginning of World War II not only meant hard work and sacrifice for women in the United States it also meant opportunity In the 1920s and 1930s, women journalists were frequently labeled as sob sisters or newshens, and their news stoWhen war broke out in Europe in 1939, American women had no way of knowing how much the next six years would change their lives The beginning of World War II not only meant hard work and sacrifice for women in the United States it also meant opportunity In the 1920s and 1930s, women journalists were frequently labeled as sob sisters or newshens, and their news stories usually appeared on the women s society page, deep inside the newspaper But when war exploded around the world, these female reporters wanted than just front page assignments They wanted to be where the action was, and fought for the right to report from the front lines.From Margaret Bourke White, who covered the battles in Russia to Lee Miller, who photographed the wounded in field hospitals in France to Shelley Mydans, who was a prisoner of war in the Philippines to Marguerite Higgins, who reported at the liberation of Dachau, Catherine Gourley tells the personal stories of some of the female legends of journalism in this important and timely book.Filled with stirring period photographs and news clippings, War, Women, and the News explores the conflicts and challenges these women faced before, during, and after World War II Their images and bylines would crack open a door for future generations of aspiring female journalists.
War Women and the News How Female Journalists Won the Battle to Cover World War II When war broke out in Europe in American women had no way of knowing how much the next six years would change their lives The beginning of World War II not only meant hard work and sacrifice for

  • Title: War, Women, and the News: How Female Journalists Won the Battle to Cover World War II
  • Author: Catherine Gourley
  • ISBN: 9780689877520
  • Page: 438
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “War, Women, and the News: How Female Journalists Won the Battle to Cover World War II”

    1. This book follows women journalists covering war. It wasn't always easy being a female journalist, as many editors considered journalism as a man's career. Many women had to force their way into the field kicking. It was great to learn about how women impacted the field of journalism as well as photo journalism especially during times of war. As we know war has not often been considered to be a good place for women throughout history, but these women proved to their bosses and the world that the [...]

    2. I saw War, Women and the News by Catherine Gourley at the library on display in the front room. Every month the librarians put together a set of books on a certain subject. I think this book was part of the World War Two display.The book has a bunch of brief introductions to some of the first female journalists to cover war and other male dominated fields of the news (sports, international affairs and politics). The bulk of the book though focuses on coverage of World War Two by women.Included w [...]

    3. I liked the information presented in the book but not the way it was presented. The book followed the course of WWII, telling the reader what different journalists were doing during the different parts of the war. I would have liked to feel more of a connection to the journalists and read a separate chapter on each of them, following their entry into war journalism through the end of the war and beyond.

    4. Summary: This book ends with a discussion of Christiane Amanpour, who has covered news in war zones for CNN for more than 20 years. She is following in the footsteps of women like Margaret Bourke White and Therese Bonney who struggled to be allowed to cover the news during World War II. Before the war began, women who wrote for newspapers were called "newshens" and their work was confined to the women's pages of newspapers. They wrote mostly society gossip and housekeeping tips. As the war began [...]

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