The Fairies in Tradition and Literature

Fairies fascinate young and old alike To some they offer tantalizing glimpses of other worlds to others a subversive counterpoint to human arrogance and weakness Like no other author Katharine Briggs throughout her work communicated the thrill and delight of the world of fairies and in this book she articulated for the first time the history of that world in traditionFairies fascinate young and old alike To some they offer tantalizing glimpses of other worlds to others a subversive counterpoint to human arrogance and weakness Like no other author Katharine Briggs throughout her work communicated the thrill and delight of the world of fairies and in this book she articulated for the first time the history of that world in tradition and literature.From every period and every country poets and storytellers have described a magical world inhabited by elfin spirits Capricious and vengeful or beautiful and generous theyve held us in thrall for generations And on a summers morn as the dew dries softly on the grass if you kneel and look under a toadstool well
The Fairies in Tradition and Literature Fairies fascinate young and old alike To some they offer tantalizing glimpses of other worlds to others a subversive counterpoint to human arrogance and weakness Like no other author Katharine Briggs

  • Title: The Fairies in Tradition and Literature
  • Author: Katharine Mary Briggs
  • ISBN: 9780415286015
  • Page: 305
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Fairies in Tradition and Literature”

    1. This is a superb book!Briggs surveys the fairy lore and literature of the British Isles with a sympathetic, shrewd eye. She has a strong sense of the aesthetics of wonder - of how the sublime and the uncanny are two sides of a coin that has no room for mere whimsy or easy didactic. This instinct for the aesthetics of the 'true' fairy is reliable - it's the chief reason why Briggs intuits that the Cottingley fairies are inauthentic. That, and the fact that they look suspiciously like sentimental [...]

    2. An overview. Assumes your basic knowledge of the facts, like the fluttery flower fairies are not the original conception. Indeed, she is careful to point out that the tiny fairies are indeed part of the tradition, as one of the oldest recorded accounts, of beings called Portunes, make them an inch high. Not that that size was commonplace.Covers all sorts of topics. Like fairies attached to familes, apparent nature spirits like the Blue Hag that fights with Spring every year and when she loses, t [...]

    3. Briggs' described this book as a continuation of her book The Anatomy of Puck in which she examined fairies in relation to Shakespeare's work, as well as other writers of that time. It is a wonderful reference book and is a pleasure to read.The text is divided into three units: The Fairy Peoples, Traffic With the Fairies, and Some Literary Fairies. It also contains a nice appendix with lists and definitions of fairy types and specific fairies. Last winter, this list was used by my niece (age 11) [...]

    4. Original Review hereSo, it's not that I'm being lazy, but I'm rolling both of these reviews into one. I was going to write two, but the subject matter is so similar, and I really don't know if it's subject matter that will interest other people at all, and it just seemed easier, since I finished them a few days apart.My nerdery is in full, giddy bloom with these two books! Quick synopsis. Both of these books are nonfiction, classics (more or less) in the field of folklore and mythology studies. [...]

    5. Briggs does a fantastic job of presenting a great breadth of information on the folklore and writings on fairies throughout the ages, truly as comprehensible as possible in a dense format that avoids unnecessary lengthiness. It is a great introduction to the subject for anyone interested in fairy lore as well as its literary development in more modern times, with an extensive list of sources for those interested in then exploring the stories further.

    6. Provides a decent overview of fairy lore in the UK, but each topic is covered somewhat cursorily and Briggs at times assumes prior knowledge of the subject and/or the literary canon which is not necessarily warranted.

    7. Such a great book for people are interested in true fairy folk-lore and not the dumb Disney, sugar-coated faeries.

    8. Briggs is the authority on fairies and this book is fascinating if a little dense. It is difficult to chew through but very worth it if you have an interest in fairies.

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