The Three Witches

The three bad witches are hungry Let s eat these children, they say They may have teeth that are longer than their lips and they may wear high heels, but they are no match for two smart children, their brave grandma, three hound dogs, and a fast running snake The Three Witches was first published in Every Tongue Got to Confess, the third volume of folklore collected bThe three bad witches are hungry Let s eat these children, they say They may have teeth that are longer than their lips and they may wear high heels, but they are no match for two smart children, their brave grandma, three hound dogs, and a fast running snake The Three Witches was first published in Every Tongue Got to Confess, the third volume of folklore collected by Zora Neale Hurston while traveling in the Gulf States in the 1930s It has been adapted for young people by National Book Award winner Joyce Carol Thomas The vibrant paintings have been masterfully executed by internationally celebrated artist Faith Ringgold.
The Three Witches The three bad witches are hungry Let s eat these children they say They may have teeth that are longer than their lips and they may wear high heels but they are no match for two smart children thei

  • Title: The Three Witches
  • Author: Joyce Carol Thomas Faith Ringgold Zora Neale Hurston
  • ISBN: 9780060006495
  • Page: 260
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Three Witches”

    1. Thanks to one of my ' friends, I was suggested the author Faith Ringgold. My class will be reading all her picture books that my library has because they are great for our Black History Month unit. This book was very entertaining. It had a completely different plot that my students instantly clung to. The only part of the book they didn't like was the beginning and the end. They were both very unclear. There was no ending to this book. It just stopped.

    2. This is a strange little book about witches trying to eat children. However, the more I pondered it, I realized that it is no stranger than the folklore and fairy tales that I read as a child. It's just that reading for the first time as an adult kind of threw me off-kilter.

    3. Title: The Three WitchesAuthor: Joyce Carol Thomas Illustrator: Joyce Carol Thomas Genre: LegendTheme(s): Be careful of witches. Opening line/sentence: Three witches had already eaten a boy and a girl’s mother and father, so their grandmother took them to live with her far off into the woods. Brief Book Summary: Two children that live with their grandmother are home alone when witches soon arrive at their home. They run away to escape and finally get saved by their dogs. Professional Recommend [...]

    4. Hurston, Z.N. (2006). The three witches. New York: Harper Collins Publishers."The Three Witches" by Zora Neale Hurston, retold by Joyce Carol Thomas, and illustrated by Faith Ringgold, is a tale of three witches, who with their long teeth and claws, hunt for young children. It follows two children who are left alone as their grandmother goes to hunt for food, and while, she is gone three evil, and hungry witches appear . The are dead set on eating the children. But, the children are too smart, a [...]

    5. I'm not sure if this is an adaptation of an old village tale, but it seemed a bit strange. There is a boy and girl whose parents were eaten by the three bad witches that live in the forest. The kids go to live with their grandma, who leaves them home alone to go to the store. The three witches come to kill and eat the children, so they run away. While running, they climb up in a tree that the witches then begin to start chopping down with axes. The children begin chanting at them, which causes t [...]

    6. Overall I really enjoyed the story with the lack of details. Every children story tale has this grand introduction, middle, and simple ending. This story is about these three witches who killed this boy and his sister's parents by eating them.Since they are orphans, the grandmother takes care of them and one day leaves to go do groceries and horrifically the witches appear and wreak havoc on these poor innocent children.I love the illustrations and felt like I didn't get enough of the story and [...]

    7. While the content of the story could rival Grimms' Fairy Tales in scariness and gruesomeness (Hansel and Gretel only had to deal with one witch!) the distinctive style of the black folk tale, as written by Hurston and retold by Joyce Carol Thomas, sets this tale apart. Faith Ringgold's illustrations are striking, as always, and I appreciated that the stereotypical witch in black is not portrayed. These witches sport skin colors of orange, green and purple! But my favorite illustration is the art [...]

    8. This could turn out to be a fun read aloud, if performed in the right way; maybe something for Halloween if you are tired of reading the same old-same old. Faith Ringgold's illustrations are colorful and exciting; particularly the witches, who look like monsters (with teeth longer than their lips, to quote the story) dressed up as ultra-cool urban African American women from the 1970s. The story is scary and gruesome, which makes it all the more fun.

    9. Oooh, these witches are scary. A person sort of roots for them, just to see what would happen if they won out. I'll have to read this one again, because somehow the kids and the grandma were not as engaging for me on first read. There is somewhat too much green for me, too.

    10. Not my favorite "witchy" story (I thought it ended abruptly), but I did enjoy the illustrations a lot.

    11. This folktale of the American South, collected by Zora Neale Hurston & adapted here by Joyce Carol Thomas, is a delightful mixture of terror & humor. The last line is the absolute best, & had me caught off-guard & laughing out loud. Faith Ringgold's paintings are also great.

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