My Name Is Sangoel

Sangoel is a refugee Leaving behind his homeland of Sudan, where his father died in the war, he has little to call his own other than his name, a Dinka name handed down proudly from his father and grandfather before him When Sangoel and his mother and sister arrive in the United States, everything seems very strange and unlike home In this busy, noisy place, with its eSangoel is a refugee Leaving behind his homeland of Sudan, where his father died in the war, he has little to call his own other than his name, a Dinka name handed down proudly from his father and grandfather before him When Sangoel and his mother and sister arrive in the United States, everything seems very strange and unlike home In this busy, noisy place, with its escalators and television sets and traffic and snow, Sangoel quietly endures the fact that no one can pronounce his name Lonely and homesick, he finally comes up with an ingenious solution to this problem, and in the process he at last begins to feel at home.
My Name Is Sangoel Sangoel is a refugee Leaving behind his homeland of Sudan where his father died in the war he has little to call his own other than his name a Dinka name handed down proudly from his father and gra

  • Title: My Name Is Sangoel
  • Author: Karen Lynn Williams Khadra Mohammed Catherine Stock
  • ISBN: 9780802853073
  • Page: 324
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “My Name Is Sangoel”

    1. This book reminds me of another one I read, My Name Is Maria Isabel by Alma Flor Ada, about a girl from a Latin American country whose teacher in her American school decides to shorten or change her name because there are too many similar names in the class. Names are important, and I think, rather than forcing immigrants to "Americanize" their names, we should encourage them to keep their names, which link them to their ethnic heritage. Names are who you are, after all. Out of respect we should [...]

    2. I live in an area in New york that has a big refugee population and the settling in process can be overwhelming. This is a good book for young kids probably up to 2nd-5th grade about new life to America for a refugee from a child's point of view. This young boy came from war torn Sudan!

    3. Many people change their names when they move to the United States so Americans will have an easier time with pronunciation. This is a story about not changing your name. It's about holding on to your identity and reaching out to your new community at the same time. What a wonderful lesson for all kids in the age of globalization. Note: If you're going to share this, make sure to read through it once first so you're pronouncing Sangoel correctly throughout.

    4. A very gentle conversation starter for kids about refugees and particularly, the experience of a refugee child assimilating into a new country and home. The details of the story are very little-kid-friendly, with no gory details or traumatic pictures. Great for building empathy and awareness.

    5. This story is about a boy named Sangoel who is a refugee and whose family had to run in the middle of the night to escape the war, unfortunately his father was killed. The family was brought over to America where they had to adjust to the new lifestyle. The lady who took care of them was Mrs. Johnson, and she taught them how to do things like cross the street, cook on the stove, and eat a fork.I really enjoyed this story because it told the story of a boy and his family that had to leave their h [...]

    6. This book was selected for our Roanoke Valley Big Read primary category. I read this book and did some research on the topic to use to intro. this story to me younger classes. It's hard to imagine being in a refugee's shoe! The students were touched my this story, too.

    7. I love this book! I teach middle school, and I always start the school year off with it. We read it as a class and we discuss the importance of names, of respecting each other by saying each other’s names properly, and of not giving unwanted nicknames to each other. We also discuss (and practice) how to help others say our own names correctly. I highly recommend this book for elementary through middle school, partnered with “The Name Jar”. Both are great books!Side note for teachers: It’ [...]

    8. A powerful book to share about refugees, identity, and the power of one's name.Pair with The Name Jar, or Calling the Water Drum, The Treasure Box, The Journey, My Beautiful Birds, Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family's Journey, Where Will I Live?, Her Right Foot for a refugee/immigration text set.

    9. “My Name is Sangoel” by Karen Lynn Williams is a very powerful children’s book. It takes the reader through the story of a little boy called Sangoel, who used to live in a refugee camp and is now moving to America. It tells the story through Sangoel’s perspective. Everything he was experiencing was new to him. He describes his experience of flying on a plane, using electric stairs, going to school, and living in a apartment building, which for him were all amazing and new. This book is w [...]

    10. Sangoal came to America with his mom and sister from Sudan as a refugee. When he comes to America he is having trouble getting people to pronounce his name correctly. He feels alone in this new country. This story is a great story in learning to not change your name just so people can be able to pronounce it, but loving your name and embracing that it might be hard to pronounce. This book is also a great way for people to look into the life of a refugee.

    11. In our ever diverse climate, learning and pronouncing someone's name correctly is extremely important. I love the simple way this book is illustrated. The text is so fulfilling.My name is Bet-c.

    12. This a wonderful book about a refugee family. The main storyline is how Sangoel struggles to keep his name once his family is in America, as well as the correct pronunciation.

    13. megan summer reading 2017, children's book, picture book, refugees, sudan, names, ancestry, understanding, changes, differences, first grade, second grade, third grade,

    14. A touching story of a refugee family coming to America and finding how to fit in while being true to themselves.

    15. Sangoel is an elementary-aged school boy whose family had to flee the civil war-torn Sudan. He, his sister, and his mother seek refuge in the United States. All the while, he remains true to his identity and is proud of his name, Sangoel (pronounced "sun goal"). While acclimating to the U.S he is frustrated because it doesn't seem that anyone knows how to say his name, thus not acknowledging him. Sangoel comes up with a clever way- using a rebus- for his classmates to finally understand how to p [...]

    16. This is a wonderful story for the classroom about a refugee boy from Sudan. Not only does it share some great information about what it is like to be a refugee, it also talks about the importance of one's name. Not all names are easy to pronounce, but it is critically important for us as teachers to listen to the importance and pronunciation of each child's name. Sometimes, that is all they have left that connects them to an important past and culture.

    17. Sangoel came to America with nothing but his name and his family, and he is proud of his African heritage and his Dinka name that has been handed down to him from past generations. After arriving in America he is faced with losing his name in order to assimilate with the American culture, and he decides to takes measures into his own hands.My Name Is Sangoel by Karen Lynn Williams and Khadra Mohammad tells the story of Sangoel, an eight-year-old boy, who is a Sudanese refugee. His father was kil [...]

    18. Text Set #3: My Name is Sangoel is an emotional text about a young boy whose father was killed in the war in Sudan, so he, his mother, and sister move to America from the refugee camp. One of the biggest issues that Sangoel runs into in America is the fact that everyone he comes across mispronounces his name. He believes that in America, he has “lost” his name. His mother suggests that he needs a new name, but Sangoel has an excellent idea. In order to get people to pronounce his name correc [...]

    19. Sangoel is an eight year old boy who has been living in a refugee camp with his mother and little sister. Until one day, his family gets the chance to move to America and start new. Although Sangoel cannot speak much English. except his name which most people are having trouble pronouncing. Sangoel and his family make it to the airport and find their name with a nice lady named Mrs. Johnson to help them get settled into their apartment and doctor and even school for Sangoel. Sangoel is having a [...]

    20. My Name is Sangoel takes the reader on the journey of a young Sudanese boy, fleeing from war after his father was killed, to America where he is resettled with his mother and younger sister. At Sangoel’s new school many of his teachers and classmates have difficulty pronouncing his name properly. This bothers Sangoel and he begins to worry that he is in danger of losing his family name along with his Sudanese identity. He has an idea however to help his classmates and teachers learn to pronoun [...]

    21. This is a valuable resource to use in order to introduce social studies vocabulary terms such as: immigrant and refugee. The author has written a compelling story of a young Sudanese boy who emigrates to America. The beautiful watercolor illustrations portray the painful departure and emotions of the main character and his family. They also serve to highlight the confusion of the immigrant experience for example, Sangoel travels through a crowded airport where everyone is speaking another langua [...]

    22. Illustrator: Catherine StockPublisher: Eerdmans Books for Young ReadersYear: 2009Interest Level: K-4Reading Level: 2-4I enjoyed reading this book. I like finding books related to immigrants and discussing their names. I like how this boy is determined to keep his Sudnese name and he shows such pride. Part of why I like books with this message is that I think it's important for kids to take pride in their names and who they are. They don't need to change their name, simply because a teacher can n [...]

    23. Fiction/MulticulturalAward(s): NSSTB (2010)Grade level: 2nd - 5th gradeSangoel, a refugee, leaves his homeland in Sudan after war has taken everything away from his family, including his father. He travels to America with his mother and sister, carrying on the family name, Sangoel, passed down from his father and grandfather. No one at school, even his teacher, are able to pronounce his name correctly. When he tells his mother, she suggests changing his name to something American. Sangoel is ups [...]

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