The Limits of Morality

Most people believe that there are limits to the sacrifices that morality can demand Although it would often be meritorious, we are not, in fact, morally required to do all that we can to promote overall good What s , most people also believe that certain types of acts are simply forbidden, morally off limits, even when necessary for promoting the overall good In thMost people believe that there are limits to the sacrifices that morality can demand Although it would often be meritorious, we are not, in fact, morally required to do all that we can to promote overall good What s , most people also believe that certain types of acts are simply forbidden, morally off limits, even when necessary for promoting the overall good In this provocative analysis Kagan maintains that despite the intuitive appeal of these views, they cannot be adequately defended In criticizing arguments for limited moral requirements as well as those for unconditionally prohibited acts, Kagan offers a sustained attack on two of the most basic features of ordinary common sense morality.
The Limits of Morality Most people believe that there are limits to the sacrifices that morality can demand Although it would often be meritorious we are not in fact morally required to do all that we can to promote over

  • Title: The Limits of Morality
  • Author: Shelly Kagan
  • ISBN: 9780198239161
  • Page: 296
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Limits of Morality”

    1. Kagan presents a quite clear and very thorough argument against common sense (or ordinary) morality. I found much of his argument quite convincing, and found it especially useful how he tackles many different arguments in favour of common sense morality (or at least against purely or largely consequentialist moralities) individually.

    2. Clear, strong arguments. Still, it's a long, fairly dense, book. Only recommended for those with a serious interest in academic ethics. Unger's Living High and Letting Die gives an equally strong (though far less academically rigorous) argument for similar conclusions, and it's a lot more fun to read.

    3. I bought this thing for a lot of money and stopped on the page 50. This is proper philosophy book, not for general public

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