Who Will I Be, Lord?

A lyrical story about how looking back is helpful when you start looking forward A young girl thoughtfully considers her family tree and the vibrant ancestors who populate it As each family member s story is revealed, her quiet meditation about what kind of person she ll be when she grows up transforms into a testament to the importance of sharing family stories ThA lyrical story about how looking back is helpful when you start looking forward A young girl thoughtfully considers her family tree and the vibrant ancestors who populate it As each family member s story is revealed, her quiet meditation about what kind of person she ll be when she grows up transforms into a testament to the importance of sharing family stories The simple, elegant narrative combined with Sean Qualls s evocative art makes for a wonderful read aloud experience.
Who Will I Be Lord A lyrical story about how looking back is helpful when you start looking forward A young girl thoughtfully considers her family tree and the vibrant ancestors who populate it As each family member s s

  • Title: Who Will I Be, Lord?
  • Author: Vaunda Micheaux Nelson Sean Qualls
  • ISBN: 9780375843426
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Who Will I Be, Lord?”

    1. The idea is great-- examining family members and their jobs/lives and asking "What will I be?". But a pool shark? A ditch digger? I can think of a few better examples to include in a picture book than those. The Lord reference will turn people away from it, which is too bad, as it is not a religious book. I also think this book, with the chosen occupations, as encouraging racism in children.

    2. About the Story: With a lyrical and repetitive refrain, Vaunda Micheaux Nelson tells the story of her own personal history as a little girl, and that of several different generations in her family. She goes through each branch of her family tree recalling shared stories and memories of her family history. For instance, she tells of her great grandma who was white and disowned by her parents after marrying Nelson’s great grandpa who was black. After sharing the story of each family member, she [...]

    3. This fictional narrative is about a young African-American girl who looks to her family members to figure out what she will be when she gets older. As she thinks about what members of her family do for a living, images come to life and there is a story connected to each person.As a teacher, I probably would not use this story because of the negative connotation it attaches to the African American culture. While it is a story of her life and may be realistic to the characters, I would not want my [...]

    4. Genre: Realistic fictionGrade: 2-6 Great book to discuss what children want to be when they are older. I like this book because It shows that anyone no matter what you look like or who you are can be whatever they want to be. I enjoyed how the author went through the family history and created a family tree.

    5. I hesitated on shelving this with African American fiction, but given the talk of slavery and racism I think it fits. There's a hint of history in these pages that might bear some explanation if you're reading with a young child.That said, I didn't like this book. I am guessing that the author is talking about her own family growing up? History is history and must be accepted as such. But the diversity in careers that people are celebrating in their reviews hardly bears celebration. Women are sh [...]

    6. Realistic yet enforces gender and class stereotypes.A little girl is looking back at her family: her great-grandparents, her grandparents, and her parents, and also her uncle and her cousin, for some reason, trying to figure out what she's gonna be when she grows up. There's music involved. Kind of basic jobs. Somebody's a mailman. Somebody's a preacher. Somebody is described is a jazz man but he actually works in a diner. Somebody else is a pool shark, which is kind of an odd thing to be.Everyb [...]

    7. This is a really cool book with a lot of meaning in it, some obvious and some hidden. Politically speaking, this book covers the lives of a family of African descent, and mentions that the girl's great, great, great grandfather was a slave. The girl talks of her great grandmother as well, who was white and was disowned by her parents when she married a black man, and how none of that was important. Then she continues on about her family members, each of them making the best of their situations a [...]

    8. I'm so sad to hear that Who Will I Be, Lord? by Vaunda Nelson is going out of print. This picture book is not only a sweet and inspiring read for children, but it makes a great introduction to a writing lesson for kids of any age - or even adults. I plan to use this book with middle school writers this fall when we spend time on memoir, exploring family connections, and big questions such as: who am i? where do I come from?Personally, I buying multiple copies now to giveaway to the children in m [...]

    9. A little girl talks to everyone in her family, dad, mom, grandma, great g-ma, grand-pa, uncle, cousin etc. about what they do and each time she wonders, "What will I be, Lord?" In the end she realizes it is like her mama said - it is up to me.Themes: Social issues, family, multicultural, and multigenerational. In class the teacher can start a discussion on what students want to be when they grow up, or create a family tree with occupations and it can start a discussion on social issues such as r [...]

    10. This family-history story begins with the narrator's great-grandpap who was a mailman and played banjo and her great-grandma who was white and a housewife. The story continues with the refrain of the young narrator asking "And who will I be, Lord? What will I be?" as she describes different members of her family. It's an interesting book and concept, but I think the Lord references might make it a hard one to use in schools.

    11. The idea of a girl wondering who she'll be and reflecting on the passions of various people in her family (ultimately concluding "I guess like Mama says, it's up to me") is a nice one, but it didn't particularly do much for me.

    12. Wonderful book on diversity! Shows the many jobs any person can become when they grow up. The vibrant colors and illustrations lead to many imaginations and dreams running wild and motivates the child on the spot.

    13. Great multicultural book that you can use in the classroom to teach about social/family issues. This ties in within family. Great to introduce what a child wants to be when they grow up

    14. Mixed feelings on this one, because the roles chosen are so stereotypical. Then again, it might be a true reflection of the author's family.

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