The Time: Night

From one of the most acclaimed writers at work in Russia today comes a funny yet heartrending portrait of a Russian everywoman and her majestically unstable extended family.Anna Andrianova barely makes a living as a poet, but whatever she gets, it is too little to support a household that includes a son fresh out of prison camp, a daughter with terrible taste in men, and tFrom one of the most acclaimed writers at work in Russia today comes a funny yet heartrending portrait of a Russian everywoman and her majestically unstable extended family.Anna Andrianova barely makes a living as a poet, but whatever she gets, it is too little to support a household that includes a son fresh out of prison camp, a daughter with terrible taste in men, and the grandchild who resulted from one of her daughter s doomed encounters Out of Anna s struggle to sustain and, above all, control her family, Ludmilla Petrushevskaya has created a book as dense with life as a Moscow kitchen.
The Time Night From one of the most acclaimed writers at work in Russia today comes a funny yet heartrending portrait of a Russian everywoman and her majestically unstable extended family Anna Andrianova barely make

  • Title: The Time: Night
  • Author: Ludmilla Petrushevskaya Sally Laird
  • ISBN: 9780679757689
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Time: Night”

    1. Liudmila Petruchévskaia (n. 1938)Depois de ler o excepcional livros de contos " A Mulher Que Tentou Matar o Bebé da Vizinha" (5*) surgiu o estímulo ou o desafio para ler o romance " Hora: Noite" da escritora russa Liudmila Petruchévskaia (n. 1938) editado em 1992. Numa entrevista Liudmila Petruchévskaia afirma: ”A Rússia é uma terra de mulheres que contam as suas histórias oralmente, sem necessidade de inventar. São narradoras extremamente talentosas. Sou apenas uma sua ouvinte.”.A [...]

    2. Sad and funny, mostly at the same time (laugh so you don't cry sort of thing) - the crushing poverty and scavenging for food (not for the narrator, who seems to never eat, but for her grandson); the worthless children; the insane mother :: through it all there is a determination and (not really) optimism (but something transcending cynical realism) on the part of the narrator that makes this an easier read than it has any right to be. It took me half the book to realize I was supposed to be laug [...]

    3. "The Time: Night" is a gritty and sometimes grotesque depiction of an impoverished, desperate family in Soviet Russia. The filth and squalor literally screams out from the pages as the narrator, a middle-aged woman who fancies herself a poet, strives to sustain her dysfunctional family. "Sandwich generation" indeed! The narrator feels responsibility both for a mother, who is insane, and for two children, a promiscuous daughter who produces one illegitimate baby after another and a petty-criminal [...]

    4. This book disgusted me in the same way as Naipaul's A House For Mr. Biswas - a story about a family that, for lack of a better term, sucks, and just gets more decrepit over time. What's worse is that the narrator is inexcusably powerless in the face of the rest of her family. The reader can only watch her kowtow to her children, can only trace the impotent rage that seethes beneath her skin, can only observe silently her feeble attempts to articulate boundaries, attempts which come far too late [...]

    5. Beautifully-written (even in translation, though I am told by Russian friends that the original is absolutely masterful) portrait of one woman's struggle to survive as a poverty-stricken poet in post-communist Russia, while supporting a wayward daughter, three grandchildren, and a recently released ex-prisoner son. Petrushevskaya is a master at depicting the dreariness, hopelessness, and despair of post-communist life, especially for those left to scrounge for food, to beg favors of their friend [...]

    6. But what did nine-year-old Alyona have to say, wise little girl, when the door closed for the last time on their father and I stood there with a fixed grin, tearless, with burning cheeks, about to throw myself out the window so I would meet him there, for the last time, a shapeless carcass on the pavement. To punish him."Mum," Alyona said, "do I love you?""Yes," I replied.p. 67Bleak. Depressing actually. Pretty cover though.Fast-paced language; stream-of-consciousness; very spare punctuation but [...]

    7. הספר השעה לילה הוא אחד מהספרים המדכאים ביותר שקראתי בשנים האחרונות. הוא יצא ברוסיה בשנת 1992 ותורגם השנה לעברית.הספר מתאר מזווית מאוד אישית את חייה של אישה ברוסיה הקומוניסטית, חיים של עוני מחפיר, ניצול משווע ע"י זרים וע"י בני משפחה, בוגדנות וחיים של דאגה מתמידה: לבנה העבריין, לבת [...]

    8. Chatty, stream of conscious, sarcastic writing. The tone changes and flows by the event. Sometimes well-thought out and poetic, other times frantic and neurotic. Very artfully written. It's very depressing though. Her cynicism is only a thin veneer of a deeply wounded mother.

    9. Książka jak siarczysty policzek. Obraz beznadziejnej nędzy, tak typowy dla milionów ludzi żyjących w krajach budujących komunizm. Pewnie dlatego ciężko ją ogarnąć angielskim lub amerykańskim czytelnikom (niektóre dziwaczne recenzje na GR); może gdyby czytali więcej Dostojewskiego Świetnie ta mała powieść wpisuje się w tę wielką historię rosyjskiej literatury.A ten policzek - wymierzony mężczyznom, bo generalnie to kiepsko się w życiu sprawdzamy.

    10. Больше, чем история нескольких поколений одной семьи: это можно считать тремя разными возрастами одной и той же женщины.

    11. I feel like I am a little more insane after reading this. The writing is outstanding, truly great. The book is hard to get through despite this. The narrator gives us her life story in bits and spurts, not chronologically and obviously not an honest out self aware account, and in between these delusional histories she gives emotional and one-sided rants and streams of consciousness. And yet she is still sympathetic. This crazy, mean, self deluded old woman is still a sympathetic character that y [...]

    12. I really did not like this book. Granted, I've never had to read a stream-of-conscious writing style before, but still. Rough book. More than mildly depressing, I'd describe it as "oppressively bleak". Like, objectively, I might say it is a "good" book, solely because it achieves this hopeless somber atmosphere so successfully. However, on the other hand, I don't really want to have to read a book like that. Without exception, from beginning to end, the entire novel reeks of crumbling family rel [...]

    13. So sardonic that it is difficult to find something to clasp onto. This is a bleak, satirical portrait of a financially unstable and emotionally destructive family in the post-Soviet era. I prefer Petrushevskaya's work in its shorter forms, which allow her macabre wit, sarcasm, and grotesque humor to pack a better punch. I found it sociologically, historically, and personally interesting, but found her writing style to be less engaging in the form of a longer narrative

    14. Deessg.Angela's Ashes with more mental illness and no Frank McCourt humor or hope. All of the characters have overwhelming burdens to bear. The adult children of Anna, the narrator,constantly take advantage of her. Anna in turn is controlling and manipulative.It reads like one long run-on sentence with no breaks for air. I read all the way to the end hoping for redemption and only got the joy of being done with the book.

    15. Hmm. I'm not sure how to rate this. It's one of those books that makes me feel a bit thick --I'm sure there's a lot there, but eh. It's written first person, stream of consciousness-style, and to be honest, that annoyed me. I had a hard time feeling immersed in the story, and didn't have the context to appreciate it beyond that.

    16. This narrative is from the perspective of an aging poet in Russia whose children take advantage of her (her small amount of money, willingness to look after her grandson, etc.). Much of the book is her complaining about it, which is annoying, but underneath the narrator's whining are some good points about how we are constantly aging and making room for a younger generation.

    17. This book was recommended to me by a Russian friend. The author is considered one of the best contemporary Russian authors. The sarcastic humor does not help to alleviate the depressing mood of the book. However, it was interesting to read and written in the style of a diary.

    18. This book was very hard to follow along with at times, almost like one long run on sentence. However that could be the intent of it, being in the mind of the writing, just pouring out all these crazy thoughts.

    19. Nużąca opowieść o rosyjskiej babce "wychowującej" wnuczka jak swego własnego syna, bezgranicznie zakochanej w rozpuszczonym bachorze.

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