Wild Wales

According to George Henry Borrow 5 July 1803 26 July 1881 was an English author who wrote novels and travelogues based on his own experiences around Europe Over the course of his wanderings, he developed a close affinity with the Romani people of Europe, and they figure prominently in his work His best known book is The Bible in Spain with an autobiographAccording to George Henry Borrow 5 July 1803 26 July 1881 was an English author who wrote novels and travelogues based on his own experiences around Europe Over the course of his wanderings, he developed a close affinity with the Romani people of Europe, and they figure prominently in his work His best known book is The Bible in Spain with an autobiographical work Lavengro and the Romany Rye about his time with the English Romanichal gypsies.
Wild Wales According to George Henry Borrow July July was an English author who wrote novels and travelogues based on his own experiences around Europe Over the course of his wanderings he develo

  • Title: Wild Wales
  • Author: George Borrow
  • ISBN: 9781404339873
  • Page: 371
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Wild Wales”

    1. The text of this book was first published in 1862. It remains essential reading for any tourist visiting Wales, because Borrow so graphically and beautifully describes the innate character of the people of Wales. As a generalisation that character is still recognisable today (2011). The quality of his prose brings to mind perfectly the poetic lilt of spoken Welsh. He tells his reader not only of the people he meets, but also of the history and legends of the area he's in. What an engrossing reco [...]

    2. Very enjoyable and readable - why haven't I read this before now? George Borrow was a great eccentric and what in Welsh is known as a "iaithgi", a largely self-taught linguist who acquired a knowledge of many languages, including Welsh. This book is an account of a trip he made to Wales in 1854, staying for a few months. His wife and step-daughter came with him to stay in lodgings in Llangollen and a hotel in Bangor, but most of his journey was alone and on foot. This book is full of funny anecd [...]

    3. This was much more readable than either Lavengro or Romany Rye - I think there were fewer tall tales in this work as well. His descriptions of the Welsh landscape are beautifully written, and his love of the language is evident. While I can't believe the Welsh peasants talked quite as fluently as he makes out, I can certainly believe their suspicion of a 'Saes' who tried to speak their language.I must declare an interest: he describes how 'the children of the lower class of Llangollen are a grea [...]

    4. Wild Wales is the account of George Burrows' walk through Wales in 1854. Now, we are not talking about a little walk, we are talking about months of walking across a major portion of Wales. He starts in Chester and enters Wales traveling to Wrexham and then on to Llangollen. He spends some time at Llangollen while he walks all over the surrounding area. Then, a long journey takes him out as far as Holy Head on Anglesey, on a round trip that eventually totals nearly 200 miles, all on foot.After c [...]

    5. George Borrow was the ultimate groupy. He travelled the length & breadth of Wales in search of his favourite poets.where they lived, where they died, where they had been! This book (as with Sheryl Strayed's "Wild") wanted me to pull on my hiking boots and set out and explore the world. A bit repetitive in parts but still enjoyable. If I hadn't read this book I would never have heard of Twm O'r Nant or read his wonderful interlude "Riches & Poverty" which was written in 1700's. Here's jus [...]

    6. A delightful voyage in time to Wales of 160 years ago. I read it with a map in hand to follow as closely as possible George Borrow's walking tour. He is able to bring the reader close to the people of the epoch, for he is fluent in English and Welsh as well as other languages, on which he occasionally makes interesting comments. During his visits to various places he introduces associated historic heroes and villains, mixed with an evident love of Welsh poetry. This book gave me a desire to retr [...]

    7. Borrow was in his early 50s when he began his walking tour of Wales. He recounts conversations and vistas, reflecting an interesting time before cars but after trains. The Industrial Revolution is at hand, and the landscape is suffering, but the people still walk barefoot upon the road and dress according to their profession. He is interested in the people, the poetry, and the history of the land. He is not a snob, and engages in conversation with all sorts. He runs into unlikely old acquaintanc [...]

    8. was fuer ei n interessantes kleines buch! borrow ist durch wales gewandert, sprach auch sehr gut walisisch und hat auf seinen wanderungen immer den kontakt zu den menschen gesucht und konnte mit seinen dialogen mehr ueber die waliser herausfinden als jemand anderes zu seiner lebenszeit erreichen koennte. die eigentuemlichkeit dieses landes und dieses voelkchens, die raue schoenheit der natur, sowie informationen ueber deren helden und geschichte, alles verpackt in borrows wandergeschichten. ein [...]

    9. A travelogue from a vanished world! Borrow walked through wild Wales, detailing his experiences and those he meets. The book provides a window in to a world where the first language of Welsh people was the mam iaith, the mother tongue. The book contains snippets of Welsh myth and legend. My own great grandfather. although English was fluent in Cymraeg, living close to the border in Shropshire he would cross into Wales for work and as this book makes clear. in the late 19th century, the language [...]

    10. An absolutely amazing book. Especially if you live in wales as you'll know where he's talking about. One of the things that makes this book s good is that it is right on your doorstep but 160 years ago. It's basically a Pub crawl around Wales where he meets up with various people and hears some very interesting stories. Lots of local history and once you've got used to the author it's extreemly funny too. Highly reccommended.

    11. Borrow lived in East Anglia, the part of England where I reside, and unlike most Englishmen, spoke Welsh. He took his wife and daughter there on holiday this travel log describes the people he met and the sites he saw. My first trip from East Anglia to Wales is this weekend, and I expect many of Borrow's observations will still hold true.

    12. This is a Librivox recording of a travelogue made by an English admirer of the Welsh culture and language in 1854. I enjoyed the work most when it discussed places where I’d been, or knew some other, associated story. The work is admired by some as a snapshot of Welsh society at the time, but I found the author a bit too overbearing in his conversations with the Welsh.

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