Dragons: A Natural History

For millennia, few animals have fascinated mankind than dragons But until now, no rigorous survey has captured them in all their glorious variety Dragons A Natural History is that surveya one of a kind book, bringing these captivating creatures to life with lavish illustrations and vivid commentary This marvelous compendium will take you on a journey that begFor millennia, few animals have fascinated mankind than dragons But until now, no rigorous survey has captured them in all their glorious variety Dragons A Natural History is that surveya one of a kind book, bringing these captivating creatures to life with lavish illustrations and vivid commentary This marvelous compendium will take you on a journey that begins with the earliest serpent dragons and continues to the present day Along the way, Dr Karl Shuker, one of the world s leading experts on dracontology, shares his wealth of knowledge on Dragon dwellings These magnificent beasts have been found in an astounding number of places Dragons and their near relatives have found niches in every ecosystem on the planet from the mountains of Greece to the forests of northern Europe to the volcanic plain of Mesoamerica to the river valleys of China and have, as a consequence, become deeply embedded in human culture Dragon variety Here are five main types of dragons, emerging from the floods or flames of history the frightening Serpents, Wyverns, and Classical Dragons of the West the Sky Dragons, including beneficent Chinese Dragons, Amphipteres, and winged New World species the Neo Dragons such as the Basilisk, Salamander, and the like as well as dozens of varieties and subspecies, including orms, guivres, lindorms, and Dragon traditions From St George s batwinged, scaly legged adversary to Wagner s Fafnir to Quetzalcoatl, mythic dragons have been a powerful presence in the legends of humanity Each of them is described and illustrated in Dragons A Natural History.
Dragons A Natural History For millennia few animals have fascinated mankind than dragons But until now no rigorous survey has captured them in all their glorious variety Dragons A Natural History is that surveya one of a kin

  • Title: Dragons: A Natural History
  • Author: Karl Shuker
  • ISBN: 9780684814438
  • Page: 156
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Dragons: A Natural History”

    1. Collection of various world tales/myths about dragons and dragon-like creatures, divided into 5 types (serpent, semi, classical, sky, neo).Each creature gets 1-4 pages (including images/depictions), so they're not overly detailed. But this book is quite short and seems to be aimed at a fairly young (middle school?) audience.Although I do feel this deserves a high star rating, if only for the following image from the "Dragons of the Future" page:Aw yeah. That's the stuff.

    2. So nice to read a "history" of dragons that isn't purely fictional! I found this book very enlightening and fun to read.

    3. This was great fun. The book is a collection of 2-6 page entries on various dragons, their legends, and stories. These are roughly organized in chapters that have some commonality, like air-dragons or neo-dragons. Each is bookmarked by a an introduction based on the commonality and coda that often focuses on a related cryptid.Many of the entries are straight tellings of dragon myths, and a lot of the classics including St. George, Fafnir, and Tiamat are here. Others are more obscure including dr [...]

    4. These stories and lore about various dragons and serpents were quite interesting. Many were also quite humorous such as the story of the guiver that was frightened away by the sight of a naked farmer.

    5. When I first read the introduction to this book, I thought it would be rather boring. Boy, was I wrong! Reading about the different types of dragons in mythological story form was fascinating!

    6. Not what I was expecting. By the intro and the description of the book I thought it would try to provide strong proof and examples to its argument of the existence of dragons, however, it was an entire book of fairy tales and legends of various reptiles (with many concessions as to how many of them were false) and I could never keep track of whether the author did believe in dragons or did not. Finished the book and I am still unsure of his argument, although I did receive some inspiration from [...]

    7. This book provided an assortment of stories and information about dragons, some familiar, some not. I like dragons a lot in artwork, so I wanted to explore the stories further. Unfortunately, I borrowed a library copy with a few pages missing so I hope some day I can get my hands on an undamaged copy. In any case, I liked reading the stories with the descriptions and speculation, fun use of language in the story-telling. As another review said, "bombastic."

    8. Charming book. From the Lambton worm to Quetzalcoatl, this book is a comprehensive catalog of Dragons and will prove satisfying if you enjoy knowing things like the difference between a Wyvern and a Lindorm (both are dragons with two legs, but the former has wings too). Other notable appearances include the Bunyip, the Piasa, the Sirrush of Babylon and the Chinese Long Wang.

    9. An odd discussion of dragon myths and their (possible) zoological inspirations. There are some very strange things in this book, including some folk legends I'd never heard of, like that of the lindorm. I found the author's coy, 'Is this stuff 'real' or not?' tone annoying, but still gave this to a dragon enthusiast family member for the holidays.

    10. I read the myths and stories about the different dragons and skipped the parts about where they wrote about what real animal the stories may have come from.The stories were interesting and the rest I found a bit boring which is why I skipped it.

    11. The book is well illustrated and discusses dragons with a cryptozoology slant. The mythology information is a bit rough round the edges. A few things are downright wrong. It's an enjoyable book, but don't rely on it heavily for research work.

    12. Peter got a book on dragons. He looked at it for most of the morning.This is Mom: Peter reads well for a Kindergartener, but not well enough to read the Dragons book.

    13. the legends were interesting, could have done without the theory and opinions about dragons being surviving dinosaurs though.

    14. Quite a useful book - a primer on anthropological dragon-lore. A good place to start studying these larger-than-life beasts.

    15. A neat book with some neat stories and pictures. The nude ones, though, were less appreciated :(

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