Jack of Fables, Vol. 7: The New Adventures of Jack and Jack

Jack Frost, son of Jack of Fables, has left our world and has decided to make his way to the Imperial Homeworld, where his mother is still trapped under a city of thorns Along the way he will encounter many fantasy monsters, brigands and troops of roving goblins, and have to battle his way through them.And while Jack Frost undertakes his quest, Jack of Fables is slowly trJack Frost, son of Jack of Fables, has left our world and has decided to make his way to the Imperial Homeworld, where his mother is still trapped under a city of thorns Along the way he will encounter many fantasy monsters, brigands and troops of roving goblins, and have to battle his way through them.And while Jack Frost undertakes his quest, Jack of Fables is slowly transforming into something unexpected and deadly.Collecting Jack of Fables 36 40
Jack of Fables Vol The New Adventures of Jack and Jack Jack Frost son of Jack of Fables has left our world and has decided to make his way to the Imperial Homeworld where his mother is still trapped under a city of thorns Along the way he will encounte

  • Title: Jack of Fables, Vol. 7: The New Adventures of Jack and Jack
  • Author: Bill Willingham Matthew Sturges Chris Roberson Russ Braun Tony Akins José Marzán Jr. Andrew Pepoy
  • ISBN: 9781401227128
  • Page: 317
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Jack of Fables, Vol. 7: The New Adventures of Jack and Jack”

    1. Reason for Reading: next in the series.I've never liked Jack of Fables as much as the original Fables series but it has been more than interesting enough to keep me reading. A lot of fans were somewhat disappointed with a "Great Crossover", however I was not one of them. I was very excited to read this new volume of Jack, knowing that a whole new story arc would be starting from the remnants that remained from the "Great Crossover". The new Jack, Jack Frost, is a lovable character, so unlike the [...]

    2. Volume 7 collects Jack of fables issues #36 to 40.The Great Fables Crossover was a giant rest for Jack of Fables. The Literals are gone, mostly.Gary and the Page sisters remained behind but they have lost their powers. Most of the Fables that had been accompaning Jack are presumably still at that roadside diner. Only Babe the Blue Ox is still around and he soon enough sets out on his own. (this way not only can Babe have his flights of fancy, they can take place in some fairly bizarre settings.) [...]

    3. Extremely boring. Without the literals story this series completely lost it's steam. Jack Sr. minus his snark isn't actually any fun. Jack is the Teflon man, I don't actually want to see him "get his" unless it's the Page sisters who are giving it to him, that would have some satisfaction in it. Gary as a human is has lost his whimsy, he's not in love with a mannequin or doing any other unpredictable things. And Jack Jr. isn't any different than any of thousands of fantasy heroes, completely bla [...]

    4. These books are fun. Read them all relatively quickly, so I can't give a deep review. They're fun and make me laugh. Enough said.

    5. It's in this volume that starts the shift of power: good old Jack of Fables starts to move to the sidelines of the story, giving his place to his son Jack Frost (although not so Frost anymore). As we turn each page, Jack senior begins to get fatter, grumpier and more obsessed with his treasures. Only to finally turn into a big, green dragon: the type of dragon that guards a treasure in a cave and waits for some great hero to come and slay him. It's no spoiler here, the dragon part is mentioned i [...]

    6. This volume is a turning point where Jack Frost, the son of Jack of Fables, takes the book over and the original Jack of Fables has been turned into.mething else. And it looks like he'll stay transformed. This was one of the better volumes of this series because like a lot of readers, I just didn't like Jack of Fables. He wasn't the usual "rogue with a heart of gold", he was just a total jerk most of the time, and sometimes flat out evil. I think the book will be better with Jack Frost, who is m [...]

    7. Divertente come al solito. La storia si sdoppia nel (per ora, apparentemente) destino del Jack che conosciamo, alternato alle avventure del figlio, che diversamente dal padre aspira ad essere un eroe nel senso più classico del termine. La sua prima avventura lo vedrà affrontare i cattivi di Bone, o una loro citazione. Il solito stile frizzante di Willingham, le solite trovate da favola "revisionista", soprattutto per la parte del Jack tradizionale, mentre il figlio è un filo più conformista [...]

    8. Honestly felt completely meandering and superfluous. It's still witty and funny, but spinning its wheels.

    9. This volume represented a new shift in the "Jack of Fables" series. For better or worse, the chocolate of "Fables" has gotten into the peanut butter of "Jack", as demonstrated by the fact that half this volume is actually about Jack of the Tales' son by Lumi (aka: The Snow Queen) as he struggles to come to terms with the discovery that his mother is evil and his father is a narcissistic scumbag. Despite what the cover seems to indicate, Lumi herself does not make an appearance (in fact, none of [...]

    10. Reprints Jack of Fables #36-40 (September 2009-January 2010). Jack relates to the Pathetic Fallacy aka Gary about his time in Africa when he became lord over a group of Fable apes. Jack then discovers things are changing for him as his body begins to change just when he has struck it rich. As Jack faces problems of his own, his son Jack Frost sets out to become a hero with a magic owl named MacDuff and discovers being a hero can be tougher than it seems.Written by Bill Willingham, Matthew Sturge [...]

    11. This is volume 7 of the Jack of Fables paperbacks and it collects issues 36-40. It was again written by Bill Willingham and Matthew Sturges with a one-off story written by Chris Roberson. The art was by various combinations of Tony Akins, Russ Braun, Andrew Pepoy and Jose Marzan, Jr. Although only a filler story after the major crossover event, Roberson's story was everything I love about a Jack of Fables story. It was funny and had Jack furiously trying to work an angle at every opportunity - s [...]

    12. Anyone who has read the Fables/Literals crossover in Fables Vol. 13 will remember the Deus Ex Machina in the end - many of us were disappointed with how it ended. This has its ramifications for this story, and doubtlessly it will for the next Fables volume as well. I'm still reeling from that Deus Ex Machina, because it was so terrible.Fortunately, this book is better in other aspects. Jack Frost is a very likable character, and it's hard to not want to cheer him on as he goes on his hero quests [...]

    13. OK, this one was a doozy. It is about Jack of the Fables and about his son, Jack Frost. They have separate adventures and both are somewhat predictable. At the end of the book, not sooner. All I can say without completely giving it away is that what happens to Jack of the Fables is an absolutely hilarious case of poetic justice. Since Willingham has thrown complete twists many times before, you'd think this one was predictable but it wasn't. And although he claims that one of the Jacks is now di [...]

    14. Okay, first off.what the heck is up with that cover? It's got Jack Frost (AKA Jack Jr.) and the Snow Queen, but what's with the anthropomorphic carrot? The owl-woman? The gnome and the fungus lady don't show up either. So I'm all manner of confused about the choices here.The story? Oh, the story was fine. We start off with Jack spinning a tall tale about his exploits as the Lord Of The Jungle, allegedly inspiring a young writer named Edgar in a bar to go on and write about a certain Lord Greysto [...]

    15. You see, I keep scrupulous track of when I start and finish a book, and how many pages it has, and its original date of publication, and I even have a spreadsheet (NERD ALERT!) that averages all of these figures out for my own personal knowledge and nerdery. But danged if I can properly and completely remember, two years later, the content of a trade paperback, no matter how much I may've liked it. JACK OF FABLES is always good for a few yuks. This appears to be the last one I read. Lord only kn [...]

    16. Oh my god, I feel as if this series is ruined for me now! I’ve stuck around for every douchetastic moment that Jack has had, but this new turn of events has me hating everything about this story. The part where Jack started getting fat and unpleasant looking should have been funny, but it just came off as lame. The Tarzan side story also fell pretty flat. I especially didn’t like the whole twist at the end with the crazy thing that happens to Jack. I don’t know… I’ve always liked Jack, [...]

    17. Another book that makes me really wish allowed us to give half stars. I waffled between a four and a three for this, but ultimately the main storyline's weakness didn't make up for some of the awesome bits in between. Babe the Blue Ox's stories are always a stitch, and there are some really fun meta discussions about the nature of writing and art and the author/character relationship. The twisted take on Tarzan of the Apes at the beginning of the volume was also quite good. However, I don't rea [...]

    18. Jack of the Fables hits new lows - in the first story he adds racism and species-ism to his list of crimes.The story picks up considerably when we return to his son Jack Frost, and his quest to become a hero. Jack Frost is a likable character and I would much rather read about him than his feckless father.Back down to original Jack, who has now added fat jokes to his repertoire, and continues to abuse the hospitable nature of his sidekick Gary. Even Babe has gotten fed up of him and goes off on [...]

    19. #36 - Cute, simply intro back into Jack's world. Love the allusion to the ape man fable :)#37 - I definitely think I like Jack Frost. Nice guy. And I am curious as to what is happening to Jack! About time haha! And I think I finally understand why Jack and the Fables don't seem to remember the stuff with the Literals.#38 - Haha, I love what's happening to Jack. I think his son's story is not quite as interesting, but still worth reading.#39 - Haha, priceless, turning Jack into a dragon. Still no [...]

    20. This is pretty much the start of a new status quo for this book and also the beginning of the end as vol.9 is the last one. This is focused on two story lines now. The original Jack from the book is changing physically and it is an interesting change. They didn't really explain why it is happening (there is a little throw away of why it is happening but it's pretty weak) though there are two more volumes left. The other main story is focusing on his son Jack Frost. He is now free from his mom's [...]

    21. Cliffhanger drat!Interesting developments for Jack of Tales. I liked him as a side character in the Fables mythos, and have picked up a few of his solo tales from time to time. He's an anti-hero, and the declared "archetype of the lovable rogue (minus, according to many, the lovability)". His archetype status leave lots of room for stories, but none of them are likely to show much character development. But the plots and cast are likable, the storytelling fun and they often break the fourth wall [...]

    22. Gary: I don't think there's a way [to change back into a human from a dragon], unless you can learn to truly love others more than you love gold and yourself.Jack: Then I'm doomed!And doomed he was, unto the very end of time.Next: It's all Jack Frost's book from now on.That is comic gold. Jack's whole life leading up to that abrupt end. I love the shifted focus to Jack Frost and Geppetto's abandoned wooden owl and hope the few remaining issues I have with them are well-spent. The ingenious switc [...]

    23. In this volume, Jack seems to have finally dispensed with all of his likeable qualities, but at least the author seems to recognize that.The volume opens with a short story, Jack'n'Apes, and then moves into The New Adventures of Jack and Jack. Jack comes to a bad end (we can only hope, but we've learned in the past not to trust those little addresses to the audience), and the narrative shifts to Jack Frost, a gallant hero (for now). He meets MacDuff, a mechanical owl, and together they start a t [...]

    24. Finally, a break from that greedy narcissistic bastard Jack Horner. This volume follows his son, Jack Frost, as he decides to take up the mantle of a hero, but has a difficult time finding people who need to be saved. Yet, ultimately Jack Frost gets what he wants—an opportunity for he and his trusty sidekick to prove how awesome they are. And unlike his father, he doesn't do it for money, or even to get laid. How did he get to be such a good guy with parents like Jack and Lumi?Oh. Speaking of [...]

    25. It seems that this title will now focus more heavily on Jack's newly discovered son, Jack Frost, as he honorably attempts to become a hero. We still got scenes with Gary and the original Jack but they were, thankfully, short. Basically original Jack is being transformed as a way to work him out of the comic, but I'm not sure that I'm any more interested in his son.Jack Frost, as of yet, isn't too compelling.Frost has a wooden owl and the ability to move between worlds. He takes on a pretty borin [...]

    26. I have to say, I prefer Jack Frost's adventures to the original Jack! Jack Frost sets off to do heroic deeds after getting some advice from one of the Page sisters. He finds himself in a bit over his head with conflicting obligations as he tries to make all sides resolve their issues. I especially like his companion, Macduff. Meanwhile, the original Jack tells a forgettable story about his time with the apes. He also starts experiencing a hilarious transformation as retribution for his miserly w [...]

    27. Not quite a four star collection, but a solid three in DC continuing Jack of Fables series. Jack is very much on the sidelines, and appears to have been written out of his own book by the end of this installment. He has been replaced by his illegitimate son Jack Frost (the Snow Queen is his mother). Jack Frost, unlike Jack of Fables, wants to be a hero, and we watch the start of attempts at being a hero. The first chapter tales a Jack of Fables tale and is filled with Easter Eggs for anyone who [...]

    28. I'm so over Jack now that I was able to catch up to the Fables Crossover edition, but I wanted to finish what I've started. The best part of this though is fat Jack! Fat Jack! (view spoiler)[I'm a big fan of Jack turning into a dragon <3 And while I can't remember it clearly now, I believe this is the volume that explains how Jack Frost came about as a result of Jack fraternizing with Lumi, the Snow Queen, turning her into the wicked menace that she is now as seen in the Fables storyline.(hid [...]

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