The Story of Libraries: From the Invention of Writing to the Computer Age

In this fully updated edition, this book continues to explore the ways in which men and women collect and organize the records of human experience.
The Story of Libraries From the Invention of Writing to the Computer Age In this fully updated edition this book continues to explore the ways in which men and women collect and organize the records of human experience

  • Title: The Story of Libraries: From the Invention of Writing to the Computer Age
  • Author: Fred Lerner
  • ISBN: 9780826429902
  • Page: 424
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Story of Libraries: From the Invention of Writing to the Computer Age”

    1. Lerner is a chauvinist jerk with a hard-on for Melvil Dewey.Other than that it's a pretty good intro to the history of American and European libraries.

    2. Lo dicho, las lecturas que necesitaba para hacer mi trabajo son fascinantes. Algunos libros, como éste, sólo los he mirado por encima y he leído capítulos sueltos, pero me he quedado con ganas de leerlos con calma más adelante. Hacer el trabajo de final de grado ha sido muy duro, pero las lecturas han sido muy interesantes y entretenidas. He tenido muuuuucha suerte con eso.

    3. This book was sexist, elitist, and pretentious. It was very American-centric, with Britain as a runner up. It was torture to read, but I had to for school.

    4. This was a better book than the reviews give it credit for, in my opinion (either that or the other books on the subject are really going to be fantastic!). The overview of library history was very readable, and the second half of the book that dealt with library issues - including modern library issues - was a good high level overview as well. This book won't teach an MLS anything new, but its a good overview for those of us with an interest in libraries, but no formal background in the subject [...]

    5. An interesting overview to some of the key themes and main points in the story of libraries (and documents) that follows a relatively traditional path. Easy to read and whilst not an academic text (it's described as a story not a history) has notes for direct quotations and large bibliography to follow up for those who want to dig deeper into episodes and debates than this kind of grand narrative approach can allow.

    6. I read this for a course in International Librarianship. It was, in my opinion, one of the only redeeming moments in the course. I love history in the first place and this book was very detailed and informative and INCREDIBLY readable. I would actually read parts of it out loud to my boyfriend when we went camping this summer and he was also interested in it. He's going to read it now that I'm done.

    7. I do not like the fact that he sort of blames the bad status of the librarian profession on women and their allowance to work as a librarian, there's so much more to this whole thing. But other than that, a pretty interesting book. (I read this for school.)

    8. Great book about the history of libraries, their function in society and how it's changed over time.

    9. It's a very interesting book but very academic. I think it will be a good reference book rather than for leisure read.

    10. This book provides a good historical foundation for libraries, their roles in the world and how they've developed alongside technology over the centuries. It's quite interesting!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *