How to Clean a Hippopotamus: A Look at Unusual Animal Partnerships

How to Clean a Hippopotamus, a book about animal symbiosis, offers readers a close up, step by step view of nature s fascinating partnerships Find out why a mongoose comes running when a warthog lies down, how a crab and an iguana help each other out, why ravens follow wolves, and Witness the ingenious lifestyles of some of the world s most unusual animal partners iHow to Clean a Hippopotamus, a book about animal symbiosis, offers readers a close up, step by step view of nature s fascinating partnerships Find out why a mongoose comes running when a warthog lies down, how a crab and an iguana help each other out, why ravens follow wolves, and Witness the ingenious lifestyles of some of the world s most unusual animal partners in this book of curious biology, a symbiotic collaboration by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page.
How to Clean a Hippopotamus A Look at Unusual Animal Partnerships How to Clean a Hippopotamus a book about animal symbiosis offers readers a close up step by step view of nature s fascinating partnerships Find out why a mongoose comes running when a warthog lies

  • Title: How to Clean a Hippopotamus: A Look at Unusual Animal Partnerships
  • Author: Steve Jenkins Robin Page
  • ISBN: 9780547245157
  • Page: 203
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “How to Clean a Hippopotamus: A Look at Unusual Animal Partnerships”

    1. A fascinating tour through symbiotic relationships in the animal kingdom, this book uses comic book frames and short text bubbles to become incredibly appealing to reluctant readers. Filled with Jenkins’ paperwork illustrations that offer clarity beyond that of photographs, this book is a visual treat. It is also filled with interesting facts, and is sure to surprise even the most informed reader with several of the relationships inside. Journey through symbiotic relationships where one animal [...]

    2. This is an absolutely superb book about animal symbiosis. I learned so much. The information is given in a fascinating manner. The illustrations are outstanding.This “symbiotic collaboration” between Steve Jenkins and Robin Page is just terrific.The (collage?) illustrations are gorgeous, educational, and riveting.The information is so interesting. I learned a lot. In fact, I knew very little of the details contained in this book. As I was reading, I couldn’t help thinking that this is one [...]

    3. Another great Steve Jenkins animal book for older students, this one is set up in something of a graphic novel format with information and illustrations presented in boxes. Various symbiotic relationships in the animal kingdom are presented. This is the second Jenkins' book I've read that he's written with Robin Page (the other was What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?). It's fun that they describe their collaboration as symbiotic. There is a lot of information presented here, but splitting it u [...]

    4. Intricate and colorful torn paper collages illustrate the fascinating symbiotic (mutualistic) relationships between various animals and organisms. Their stories are told in comic book/graphic novel-like panels, describing the nature of the relationship and how it benefits each animal. Even if you know something about symbiosis, this book really brings it to life – from cleaner birds and fish that risk their lives removing parasites from otherwise deadly predators to interspecies hunting teams [...]

    5. • How to Clean a Hippopotamus tells about the symbiotic relationships in the animal kingdom. The book does a wonderful job of illustrating these relationships and these animals use to live healthy lives in the wild. • K-5th Grade• This book could be a great addition to a science lesson about symbiotic relationships in the animal kingdom. • Individual students that enjoy learning about animals would benefit from this book.• Students in a science class are put into small groups based on [...]

    6. The illustrations for this book were fantastic. I loved how they made collages with different materials that still looked like actual photos of the animals. There was a lot of neat relationships in this book and I thought it did a good job of being educational without being boring. In fact, I wasn't bored at all, and I learned several things that I didn't know after reading this book. I'd definitely recommend.*Taken from my book reviews blog: reviewsatmse/2010

    7. The comic-book style layout, collage art, and rich colors of How to Clean a Hippotamus make this book instantly visually attractive. Its appeal, however, goes beyond just surface level. The intriguing animal pairings are coupled with highly accessible descriptions of their symbiotic relationships, and the simple but engaging illustrations provide the perfect scaffold for understanding. An included further reading list and end section detailing the size, habitat, and diet of each animal mentioned [...]

    8. Did you know that giraffes have a lasting friendship with oxpeckers? They do! An annoying pest that torments giraffes and other savanna animals is a favorite meal for oxpeckers. Oxpeckers even sing during their meal breaks while hitching a ride on the giraffe and other animals.Animals know how to make unlikely friends and this non-fiction picture books shows you just which animals have these unlikely friendships and why.Written and illustrated by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. Published by Hought [...]

    9. This is a fantastic book showing children how these animals can get along with each other. Symbioses is a huge part of our ecosystems.

    10. This book about animal partnerships is a fun introduction to nonfiction graphic literature. As an adult, I liked this book a lot but decided to try it out on a real kid. I read this book with my 5 year old nephew. He was so excited, “We are reading a comic book just like Dad does!” He is still a pre-reader so much of my responsibility fell into reading the words out loud while he told me about the pictures. From this experience I realized that the illustrations told the story well enough th [...]

    11. I think I found about about this in last months Book Page and when I saw it was the same author who did What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? I knew we had to get it. Julia has loved that book for so long and we still read it on a regular basis. This is definitely as different as it is similar to her favorite Jenkins book. They're both oh so informative - even for an adult - but this is much more detailed. A detail-oriented kid, like mine, will adore it. I learned more than a few new facts mysel [...]

    12. Another great book from Steve Jenkins (and his wife, Robin Page, although I am less familiar with her). This one discusses some interesting symbiotic (yes, that word is used in the book) relationships between animals, specifically relationships in which both animals benefit. Some of these animal partnerships were familiar to me, but many were not - there were even some that I had thought I knew about, but learned that I didn't quite understand what was going on. And the partnerships are all so i [...]

    13. I loved this book! Jenkins and Page describe mutualistic symbiotic relationships (where both animals benefit) between all sorts of mammals, fish, insects, birds, and reptiles. I had heard of some of these, but a lot of them, like the sea anemone and the clownfish, were new to me. I wondered as I read how long some of these partnerships had been going on, how long ago they had been formed, and how it happened. I don't know if biologists will ever know the answers to those questions.Jenkin's cut p [...]

    14. Once again, the brilliant duo of Jenkins and Page have created a winning nonfiction picture book. This time they tackle the subject of symbiosis in the animal kingdom. As usual, the eye-catching collages of cut and torn paper grab the reader’s attention. The book’s design using separate panels helps keep the information organized. The selection of animals includes well-known collaborators like the remora and tiger shark as well as lesser-known partners such as the mongoose and warthog. Often [...]

    15. This is a wonderful example of the non-fiction that is currently being published for children. It takes a topic most kids know very little about - symbiosis - and makes it both fun and interesting. Steve Jenkins explains the symbiotic relationships of animals and insects, both familiar and exotic, in a way that kids will understand. At the back of the book, he gives further details about each animal (size, habitat and diet), and he also added titles for further reading. The illustrations are ver [...]

    16. How does a Nile crocodile keep its teeth clean? How does the sunfish care for its worm infested skin? How does the honeyguide bird break into a bees’ nest? They have partners! Using cut-paper art and a graphic-novel format, Jenkins and Page bring to life the unexpected beneficial relationships between various animals. Less familiar facts are included about well-known partnerships. For example, a clownfish slowly develops resistance to a sea anemone by brushing lightly against the stinging tent [...]

    17. I love Steve Jenkin's animal books. This one's a prime example of why what with its great, detailed collage illustrations surrounding interesting facts. I love it, the teacher's should like it, and the kids will love it. Win, win, win.Super interesting, too. Plenty of us have heard of sharks and remoras, but I doubt you've run across all of these. Illustrations are completed in panel form which looks good and will help develop graphic novel reading skills. While Jenkins points out that the anima [...]

    18. Literary Awards: N/ABook Level: 5.2Interest Level: Lower GradesBrief Summary: In this realistically designed graphic text, readers are presented with an procedural view of relationships between organisms. Steve Jenkins and Robin Page collaborate to illustrate, in an engaging manner, certain aspects regarding nature such as why ravens might follow wolves or how crabs and iguanas assist one another. In this nonfiction text, readers will truly enjoy discovering how symbiosis works in the animal kin [...]

    19. This is an interesting non-fiction picture book that looks at different symbiotic relationships found in nature. The illustrations are stunning from an art perspective -- cartoon-like, yet realistic, renderings in Jenkins' crafted paper/collage style. While I like the illustrations, I would personally rather see stunning Nic Bishop-type photographs accompany the text. With a 5th-grade reading level, I feel the cartoon-like illustrations detract from the book's appeal to the older elementary age [...]

    20. I snagged this from the library because it resembled Unusual Creatures: A Mostly Accurate Account of Some of Earth's Strangest Animals, and while it turns out there is little connection, it's still a great book and my six year old and I loved it. This is all about symbiotic animal partnerships, but not just the ones you know all about-- clownfish/anemone, dog/human, crocodile/plover and oxpecker/hippo but some more unusual ones, like seagulls and sunfish, or crabs and anemones.Nice clear, entert [...]

    21. In my opinion I really did like this book. I liked how throughout the whole book the author describes each animal and tells about each role the animals play according to each other as well as, the different kinds of relationships. The author provides the readers with specific factual information about each different type of animal. The pictures in the book are pretty good, and I liked the use of different colors. I like how the pictures are big and spacious. I would suggest this book for young c [...]

    22. An extremely informative children's book about the relationships between different species. For example, some species literally feed off of each other, or may signal to the other when there is a predator, and even hunt together. The book is probably for fourth or fifth grade, however for younger children the pictures almost tell the story themselves. I like the way the pages are set up comic book style.I think it was smart to end the book describing the relationship between dogs and humans. This [...]

    23. This is a non-fiction picture book about the symbiotic relationships between certain pairs of animals. The attractive paper art by Robin Page and the graphic novel layout make this book entertaining as well as informative. At the back of the book is area further explaining symbiosis. The animals featured in the book are also identified by name, size, habitat, and diet. This book is ideal for: elementary school students with animal research, animal buffs, reluctant older readers, and to explain a [...]

    24. This is a non-fiction picture book about the symbiotic relationships between certain pairs of animals. The attractive paper art by Robin Page and the graphic novel layout make this book entertaining as well as informative. At the back of the book is area further explaining symbiosis. The animals featured in the book are also identified by name, size, habitat, and diet. This book is ideal for: elementary school students with animal research, animal buffs, reluctant older readers, and to explain a [...]

    25. 과학 시간에 배운 상리공생, 공서, 기생이런 것들이 기억나시는지 모르겠습니다. 저는 부부 팀인 스티브 젠킨스와 로빈 페이지의 그림책을 보면서 공생관계에 대해 배웠던 것만 생각이 나더군요.텍스쳐가 있는 종이를 오려서 각가지 동물을 만들고 만화책처럼 배치해서 생태계에 존재하는 다양한 공생관계를 지루하지 않게 설명한 책입니다. 악어와 악어새처럼 많이 알려진 짝 [...]

    26. Symbiosis, the animal world equivalent to “you scratch my back, I’ll scratch your back”, is just too cool! How to Clean a Hippopotamus is a great introduction (age 6 and up) to many fascinating animal partnerships that both kids and adults will enjoy learning from. As you flip through pages of colorful cut paper illustrations you will learn about a nutty bird that happily cleans the teeth of crocodiles, a protective ant colony that safeguards the eggs of predatory birds, and a fish that ac [...]

    27. I don’t remember when I first learned that certain animals who would ordinarily be enemies have evolved to help each other, perhaps when I first read an old picture book titled Bill and Pete by Tomi DePaola about an alligator and his “trusty toothbrush”, otherwise known as a plover. This book is crammed with example after example of those unlikely pairings. Arranged in cells, rather like a comic, using the narrative style to relay the information.

    28. Another favorite by Steve Jenkins! How to Clean a Hippopotamus will engage kids of all ages as it shares a picture of symbiotic relationships over time. The different perspectives of the animals in each relationship helped me see how they depend on each other for support. The graphic novel format worked perfectly for me to follow the information and the added tidbits throughout completed the picture.

    29. The cut-paper collage illustrations are laid out in comic-like panels, a layout that I found very appealing. And it's amazing how much information the authors were able to cram into a slim book (without it being overwhelming). Sections at the back of the book give additional information about symbiotic relationships and about the animals pictured (such as where they live, what they eat, etc.).Blogged - abbythelibrarian/2010/

    30. This book is kind of organized in a strange form. It is set up comic-strip style. It is about the symbiotic relationship between many different animals. But it is very informative and interesting. It has a lot of less-known facts about animals and their relationships. It would have been nice to have real photographs. It is a very fascinating book. At the end it has facts about all the animals and plants mentioned.

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