The Clear Light of Day

Recently ordained and recently divorced, Reverend Esme Browne finds herself at an uncomfortable crossroads when stationed at the Portland Road Chapel In addition to the seaside town, she also now bears the spiritual responsibility for two country chapels, which, for the efficient, well versed, forty something lifelong student should be exciting, invigorating and evenRecently ordained and recently divorced, Reverend Esme Browne finds herself at an uncomfortable crossroads when stationed at the Portland Road Chapel In addition to the seaside town, she also now bears the spiritual responsibility for two country chapels, which, for the efficient, well versed, forty something lifelong student should be exciting, invigorating and even hopeful Esme, however, has forgotten how to pray, and, she fears, how to feel A chance encounter with an eccentric pair of country gnostics may change all that, but she ll have to be willing to juggle the demands of the Church, her parishes and a bevy of well intended but nibby neighbors, before she ll know for sure.
The Clear Light of Day Recently ordained and recently divorced Reverend Esme Browne finds herself at an uncomfortable crossroads when stationed at the Portland Road Chapel In addition to the seaside town she also now bear

  • Title: The Clear Light of Day
  • Author: Penelope Wilcock
  • ISBN: 9780781445535
  • Page: 125
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Clear Light of Day”

    1. Wilcock is the author of The Hawk and the Dove trilogy, which I have read and reread. Although she’s also written other fiction and poetry, I’ve been unaware of her work. A Methodist minister who served as a fulltime pastor to six rural congregations simultaneously in England, she’s divorced and remarried and has been assigned to the Aylesbury Circuit in Buckinghamshire, England. She believes “that God speaks to us through every smallest circumstance of life.” The Clear Light of Day se [...]

    2. This was a head-shaker. As a practicing Anglican, I appreciated the sympathetic insight into the life of a Methodist minister, (and ironically, read this after the inimitable Phil Rickman's The Secrets of Pain and I love his books, but am dismayed by the overwhelmingly negative portrait of a parish church) but found there was, if possible, too much insight in this book. Esme, the main character makes challenging decisions in the midst of crises of faith, but the first two chapters seemed to be d [...]

    3. Give this book a chance! I found it slow to get into, but as I moved through it I found myself liking it more! I really liked the characters, and enjoyed the story the most when it included Jabez and Ember. As Esme visited their cottage, I could feel myself being pulled into the haven of peace and security! Everyone should have a place like that to visit! The story did go in the direction I hoped it would, but at times I wasn't sure it would head that way. Even though at times the story seemed c [...]

    4. Two lonely souls looking for love and companionship. Esme, a divorced Methodist minister, is overwhelmed by her ministerial duties and losing focus in her spiritual journey. Jabez, mourning the loss of his beloved wife, lives a simple life, but is lonely. In Jabez's simple cottage, Esme finds a place of peace and acceptance. She is also able to find a way to connect to her inner search for God. My favorite quote: "To walk with God is an unfolding rhythm of life, a wild music of many moods and te [...]

    5. This was an interesting story. It opens with a quote "Down the avenue of trees I can see a spot of sunlight. I'm trying so hard to get there." The story opens with Esme, a Methodist minister at a stage of spiritual burnout. She is feeling unfulfilled in her personal faith and questioning her effectiveness as a minister. She meets an unusual man named Jabez who is lost in his own emotional turmoil after the death of his wife. He has a deep personal faith but finds the institutional church to be i [...]

    6. It was hard getting into it at first. Then it caught my attention and at the end lost me again. When I start reading a book I push through until the end no matter how painful it is. This could have been a great story. The Author needs to take advice from her own writing and simplify.No need to speak over our heads or to speak down to us. We are your audience. A novel or book should capture our attention and our imagination.

    7. This book was hard to get into. However, as the story unfolded, it became more clear. A couple of times I was going to stop reading it, but I am glad that I finished the book.Good lessons to be learned.

    8. interesting read. I liked Esme and her questioning. even as a minister sometimes just going through the motions is all one can do will she find what she is most wanting in her life? a friend. someone to share it with.

    9. The book reveals the spiritual journey of a Methodist and the friendship that is evolving between to people in her village. The book offers a lot of wisdom to slow down life and enjoy the place and people you care for.

    10. "Veddy British" and read a little like a Masterpiece Theater knock-off-- sort of a lesser Cranford. OK, but no revelations here.

    11. I enjoy it. This is not the usual type of book I read, but it presents some interest ideas about faith and religion.

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