Inside the Mouse: Work and Play at Disney World

This entertaining and playful book views Disney World as much than the site of an ideal family vacation Blending personal meditations, interviews, photographs, and cultural analysis, Inside the Mouse looks at Disney World s architecture and design, its consumer practices, and its use of Disney characters and themes This book takes the reader on an alternative ride tThis entertaining and playful book views Disney World as much than the site of an ideal family vacation Blending personal meditations, interviews, photographs, and cultural analysis, Inside the Mouse looks at Disney World s architecture and design, its consumer practices, and its use of Disney characters and themes This book takes the reader on an alternative ride through the happiest place on earth while asking What makes this forty three square mile theme park the quintessential embodiment of American leisure Turning away from the programmed entertainment that Disney presents, the authors take a peek behind the scenes of everyday experience at Disney World In their consideration of the park as both private corporate enterprise and public urban environment, the authors focus on questions concerning the production and consumption of leisure Featuring over fifty photographs and interviews with workers that strip cast members of their cartoon costumes, this captivating work illustrates the high pressure dynamics of the typical family vacation as well as a tour of Disney World that looks beyond the controlled facade of themed attractions As projects like EuroDisney and the proposed Disney America test the strength of the Disney cultural monolith, Inside the Mouse provides a timely assessment of the serious business of supplying pleasure in contemporary U.S culture Written for the general reader interested in the many worlds of Disney, this engrossing volume will also find fans among students and scholars of cultural studies.
Inside the Mouse Work and Play at Disney World This entertaining and playful book views Disney World as much than the site of an ideal family vacation Blending personal meditations interviews photographs and cultural analysis Inside the Mouse

  • Title: Inside the Mouse: Work and Play at Disney World
  • Author: Walt Disney Company Sharon Willis Jane Kuenz Shelton Waldrep
  • ISBN: 9780822316244
  • Page: 240
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Inside the Mouse: Work and Play at Disney World”

    1. How can you give a book ZERO stars you ask? When it's a bunch of bullsh-. Don't think I am some happily ever after DISNEY lover. I like going to Disney World, don't care for the characters, or even Mickey Mouse for that matter, and don't have anything emblazoned with the Disney label or Mouse Head. I am also a cynical person. I got this book because I had just been to Disney World and I wanted to read more about the inner workings of the place itself. It intrigued me how the workers could be so [...]

    2. An interesting look at the unseen side of Disney. It critiques and ponders everything from crying children to architecture. The blurb says "written for the general reader," so I can understand why there are so many one/zero star reviews. Maybe it should be amended to say "written for the general reader that already has a good handle on Marxist, feminist, and critical theory." I've read my fair share on feminist/queer theory and anarchism, and I got stumped on some of the references and concepts [...]

    3. Well researched. Not cynical, but clear eyed. As a consumer, I love Disney, too, but that doesn't mean its employment practices are not fair game. I like being warm in the winter, but that does not give ExxonMobil a free pass.

    4. I need to quote Charlie from Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory:"Candy doesn't have a point. That's why it's candy."And, similarly, Disney is a place of dreams and magic. It doesn't need to be overanalyzed. You appreciate Disney for what it is, period. The authors of this book do not. In fact, they claimed at one point that they didn't want to "seem negative" or portray Disney in a negative light. And yet… they didn't try all that hard to hide their disgust. If you are Marxist, Soc [...]

    5. If only I had a dollar for every time this book said "postmodern" A very critical, albeit elitist ivory tower look at Disney World. I think it's possible to critique something you like, if anything it makes the criticism more potent. Many books do this with Disney World, my favorite being Vinyl Leaves. This book, however, critiques WDW while keeping it at arm's length. I don't think many people go to Disney World expecting it to be "real," and I dislike the author's presumptions that plebians wi [...]

    6. Worse piece of crap I ever had the misfortune of reading. I'm a huge Disney enthusiast, and although I could tell from the get go that this book was going to be negatively slanted, I bought it, kept an open mind and read it from cover to cover. Now mind you, I have worked for the Disney Company as a cast member so I already have my own opinions of their ethics and practices toward their employees. I wasn't reading this book through rose colored glasses. I came away feeling as if these four or fi [...]

    7. I started this book thinking that it might actually portray Disney in a positive light. I was sorely disappointed in the realization that the authors were very cynical and sought out the worst reviewers possible to quote in this book. I'm not oblivious, I've worked for Disney and I know that there are pros and cons to everything, this theme-park included. The Disney Company is not perfect, but I still believe in it's intended ideals - the ideals that started with Walt Disney. The magic is what y [...]

    8. Here are the two sentences that did it in for me: "While it is certainly no secret that capitalism depends in part on regulating sexual identity, fantasy, and desire, what needs to be understood is how, it does so and how that process is re-enacted in the park."and in reference to young, park-going girls - thirteen or fourteen - "Waiting in the long line for "Space Mountain," brushed and arranged their own and each other's hair - a species of eroticism, not vanity - composed and sang songs, play [...]

    9. or "I Did Not Enjoy my Trip to Disney That My Spouse Made Me Go On, and I Have a Liberal Arts Degree"Marketed as some kind of behind the scenes expose of Disney World, this sad piece of claptrap represents the worst of academic wankery. A series of jargon laden essays despising Disney out of sheer hatred for the concept of entertainment, mixed with some long discredited urban myths and a disregard for facts or actual research. More reviews at Trash Menace.

    10. I originally read this collection of essays when I was in college. The authors have some very interesting interpretations of the Disney phenomena. The most compelling chapter is the analysis of Disney workers submission and resistance to "working at the rat". I recommend this book for those interested in learning more about Disney from a cultural studies standpoint.

    11. Interesting read, but I think in the end what was more interesting was that it was written by 4 or 5 people, and each has their own baggage and levels of irony to uncover, and veered back and forth between enjoying Disney World and being unable to enjoy anything except for a few pages it's almost incidental that this is about Disney at all.

    12. The essays were interesting- they contained some little known behind-the-scenes of the way things work at the Disney theme parks. It's classified as culture studies and some of the essays delve deeply into theory.

    13. This book was so anti-Disney it made me sick. Plus, there was nothing really of value in it. Waste of my time.

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