Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope

Ten years ago, bell hooks astonished readers with Teaching to Transgress Education as the Practice of Freedom Now comes Teaching Community A Pedagogy of Hope a powerful, visionary work that will enrich our teaching and our lives Combining critical thinking about education with autobiographical narratives, hooks invites readers to extend the discourse of race, gender,Ten years ago, bell hooks astonished readers with Teaching to Transgress Education as the Practice of Freedom Now comes Teaching Community A Pedagogy of Hope a powerful, visionary work that will enrich our teaching and our lives Combining critical thinking about education with autobiographical narratives, hooks invites readers to extend the discourse of race, gender, class and nationality beyond the classroom into everyday situations of learning bell hooks writes candidly about her own experiences Teaching, she explains, can happen anywhere, any time not just in college classrooms but in churches, in bookstores, in homes where people get together to share ideas that affect their daily lives.In Teaching Community bell hooks seeks to theorize from the place of the positive, looking at what works Writing about struggles to end racism and white supremacy, she makes the useful point that No one is born a racist Everyone makes a choice Teaching Community tells us how we can choose to end racism and create a beloved community hooks looks at many issues among them, spirituality in the classroom, white people looking to end racism, and erotic relationships between professors and students Spirit, struggle, service, love, the ideals of shared knowledge and shared learning these values motivate progressive social change.Teachers of vision know that democratic education can never be confined to a classroom Teaching so often undervalued in our society can be a joyous and inclusive activity bell hooks shows the way When teachers teach with love, combining care, commitment, knowledge, responsibility, respect, and trust, we are often able to enter the classroom and go straight to the heart of the matter, which is knowing what to do on any given day to create the best climate for learning.
Teaching Community A Pedagogy of Hope Ten years ago bell hooks astonished readers with Teaching to Transgress Education as the Practice of Freedom Now comes Teaching Community A Pedagogy of Hope a powerful visionary work that will enric

  • Title: Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope
  • Author: bell hooks
  • ISBN: 9780415968188
  • Page: 410
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope”

    1. incredibleAdding the quotes I noted for my own reference here (private notes section was too small).(xv) definition of dialogue: "both sides are willing to change" - Vietnamese Buddhist monk, Thich Nhan Hanh(22) "my commitment to radical openness and devotion to critical thinking was at odds with the demands that I uphold the status quo if I wanted to be rewarded"(27) "It is as though the very act of thinking about the nature of race and racism is still seen as 'dirty' work best suited for black [...]

    2. "Learned helplessness is necessary for the maintenance of dominator culture" This was my first book by bell hooks. I may be hooked. This was really the summary of everything I have been thinking about lately. Teaching, anti-racism, anti domination cultures. She also references Thich Naht Han who touched me after only a small dose of writing. I'm moving towards acceptance of the spiritual as part of the cure.The book is about how academia upholds tha status quo. How dissident voices are needed as [...]

    3. Parts of this were out of this world good; some slightly less. The chapter on sexual relations with students pushed me out of my comfort zone Loved the perspective on racism and the academy.

    4. i hope some teachers at my school will change their views and teaching systems after reading this book. iA с:

    5. I highly recommend this book to anyone who teaches or facilitates and anyone interested in deconstructing racism. It is so important. I wish I had read this years ago, before entering any learning environment as a teacher/facilitator. This book shows how teaching can work to make learning a more human process, one that challenges and works to end racism, white supremacy and sexism. While bell hooks attempts to make the book accessible to any audience, it is still very academic, but her free flow [...]

    6. A perplexing book-- if you look at it as a collection of essays, it makes more sense, but taken together it's a bizarre reading experience.One of the reasons for this is that this is without a doubt the single most poorly copy-edited book I have ever read. It's hard to get through more than a few pages at a time without stumbling across a howler of a grammatical or sentence error that an editor has let stand. From time to time these errors are sneaky, but mostly they're glaring and obvious, inte [...]

    7. I have so much to say about this book!As a youth organizer, I'm just beginning to learn what it means to frame my work as educational in nature. This book gave me lots to think about, regarding the connection between education and community-building. bell hooks seems to be in such a different place, at the writing of this book, compared to some of her her earlier works. I guess evolution is a sign of growth and consistent investment, though, right? hooks gives a lot of emphasis to the value of c [...]

    8. Not a pedagogy proper but a loose collection of essays, 'Teaching Community' addresses the progressive potential of cultural studies, her experience of black womanhood in a white society, the tricky nature of white allyship, spiritual and 'death-aware' education, the effect of shaming on the performance of students of color, and her own educational experiences under Jim Crow. The writing is plain to the point of feeling clunky at times, and the book could stand editing (there's a chapter on her [...]

    9. Another text I'm teaching. Not nearly as good as _Teaching to Transgress_, unfortunately. It's a good example of what Flower refers to as "writer-based prose." Hooks takes a lot of dense theoretical concepts and fails, in some cases, to provide a clear context for her readers, in this case, my students. She references Palmer a lot, too. In retrospect, I wish I would've chosen his text rather than hers. Still a fan of hooks, though!

    10. p.xvi – Parker Palmer believes that enlightened teaching evokes and invites community. 2 – Time Out: Classrooms without Boundariesp.15 – Understanding that there are times when we “must work for money rather than meaning,” educator Parker Palmer describes in The Courage to Teach the way continuing to work at any vocation, but particularly teaching, when we are no longer positively engaged does violence to the self “in the precise sense that it violates my integrity and identity… Wh [...]

    11. "All our power lies in understanding when we should teach and when we should learn.""We must become as articulate in naming our joys as we are in naming our suffering.""If we want change, we must be willing to teach.""Where there is domination, there is no place for lovell hooks has so much wisdom to share - her words never cease to inspire me. I could paper my walls in inspirational quotes from her, and words I need to tell myself Every. Damn. Day. In Teaching Community, hooks reminds us that w [...]

    12. bell hooks is wonderful. hooks composes thoughts that are critical, necessary and essential for good teaching. I'll need to sit with these ideas for a while before I can fully explain how important they are to me. But I know that I will continue to change my teaching practice to be more inclusive and liberating in the wake of reading bell hooks books on education. The ending quote is pivotal at a time when our country seems publically divided: "Dominator culture has tried to keep us all afraid, [...]

    13. I enjoyed many of the essays, while others seemed somewhat divergent from the main theme of pedagogy. In fact, I would have liked more discussion on pedagogy itself - much of the advice around pedagogy was implicit rather than explicit, which was sometimes hard to decipher among the essays that weren't as engaging/relevant. One of my favorite essays included in this book - that I will definitely refer back to in the future - is "What Happens When White People Change," a wonderful perspective on [...]

    14. There were some really important perspectives in here that helped me think differently about higher education. That said, the book as a whole was not as great as I was expecting.

    15. Best bell hooks I've read so far. Her writing connects themes that I don't get anywhere else. Understanding grows unlike other texts I read. pg 135-6 Baldwin homosexual

    16. Compared to hook's other work I have read, I found this book to be repetitive and echo-y of previous writing. To be honest, I was really disappointed in this book.

    17. sometimes a title is enough. teaching community? how does one teach something that informs such a large part of individual identityter all, we're already communities of people, families, belly-button possessors, happy workers, wait, hooks defines community in the postmodern sense of what most of us, especially urbanites, lack. here, the same old culprits of advanced industrialism, meritocracy, identity politics, and cultural tradition conspire together to fracture our sense of selves, orientatio [...]

    18. I've read parts of this book over the years but never the whole at one sitting. I found that the book as a whole reads very differently, or more accurately the reader's stance is different. Instead of approaching it in a pressured, pragmatic, consumerist way as a teacher seeking to teach better, I experienced the book as a deeply personal encounter--the essays feel like talks, at close range. As in all her work, bell hooks brings herself into her narrative, never shy about implicating her own fr [...]

    19. though i was sometimes frustrated by the sometimes repetitive nature of the book (i guess it's not meant to be read cover to cover), and the typos (!!!), this book has me thinking and thinking and thinking. especially about the place of spirituality in teaching. as a teacher with a spiritual and religious life, i often lament my inability to bring that to my learning community. i'm not at all interested in indoctrination or in teaching students about the particulars of my religious tradition. mo [...]

    20. The title led me to believe that this book was about teaching community in a classroom, however I found that so much of bell hooks writing is also about The teaching community itself. for that I am very gratefule beginning chapters are a recipe for what works in a classroom, creating the best conditions for learning to happen. That includes: a desire to learn in all aspects of life and throughout the day, not just in a confined space or time; a pedagogy of mind-body liberation instead of indoctr [...]

    21. For those well-versed in hooks, this book will not disappoint. In fact, it serves as a practical guide to applying some of hooks philosophy around power, race, and gender. For those starting out in education and community building, this book provides insight into how to navigate the nuances of race/gender relations in a way that is both critical and empowering to those oppressed by these systems. If the reader has privileged status, this book also discusses the importance of a humble stance and [...]

    22. It's weird that I haven't read any bell hooks, and I'm not sure (even among her titles on teaching) that this was the best place to start only because so much of what she says here has been so fully internalized into my own experiences as a teacher and student in the past decade that it felt less revolutionary than it might have when this book first came out in 2003. The various crises that have hit (and continue to impact) the higher ed community since then have made apparent what hooks signals [...]

    23. Anyone teaching in any context should read this book. If nothing else, it's a great memoir from a dynamic teacher with lots to say and reflect on about teaching and its role in our lives.But what I love about bell hooks is the readability of her writing at the same time that she is thinking about really profound and complex things (like the intersections of race, class, and gender, and how these play out in our classrooms). She's an optimist. She's a pragmatist. She's sure of herself. She's hone [...]

    24. bell hooks is brilliant, there's no doubt. that brilliance shines through in this book, as in all of hers. nevertheless, i was a little disappointed by Teaching Community, because despite the awesome name, there is not much here about actual TEACHING. it's mostly about being a university professor, which i'm not. i've heard good things about her Teaching to Trangress, and i also need to read Pedagogy of the Oppressed democratic education models are badly needed in this country, especially in the [...]

    25. Oh, my goodness! If ever there were a feminist pedagogue I'd like to meet and to hear speak in person, I would put bell hooks at the top of my list. Her writing about pedagogy, feminism, anti-racism work, and spirituality enhances and echoes much of what I have read of Parker Palmer's body of work on wholeness, education, democracy, and community, but she does so from her own, unique perspective of a radical, black feminist. I think the book has a little something for most everyone, even if not [...]

    26. This was my first bell hooks text and won't be my last. hooks is brilliant. I caught myself shouting "yes" aloud and impassionedly numerous times while reading pieces on race and intersectionality. As a recent grad unsatisfied with her education, her critiques of the university system, including a remark on the way universities put an emphasis on the future instead of allowing students to embrace learning in the present, also resonated with me.

    27. I really enjoyed this book by bell hooks. She covers a lot of topics (racism, sexism, standing up against dominator ideology in the classroom, and more), all interwoven into a piece about how education must come from a place of love. When education happens from a place of love, in or outside of the formal classroom, it leaves us open to communication, to change. At least, that is the main idea I got from this.

    28. The book starts off with a meandering autobiographical part that was off-putting, since I wasn't particularly interested in the last 10 years of the author's life. However, the middle and later chapters contain some excellent analysis of race, power, and morality issues. My biggest complaint (and this is not a fault of the book per se) is that it focuses almost entirely on higher academia and is not addressed toward youth education at all.

    29. great resource for educators, organizers, activists. Validates radical openness and embraces Frierian understanding of horizontal power and fearlessness about loving your community and breaking down manufactured boundaries in the classroom or elsewhere that perpetuate patriarchal power dynamics. An inspiring liberating read, and one (for me) rather surprising and provocative chapter and personal revelation that I'm not sure where to land on.

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