Swinburne and His Gods: The Roots and Growth of an Agnostic Poetry

Swinburne and His Gods is the first serious critical analysis to examine the poet s background in the high church in the context of his work Louis clearly shows Swinburne s fierce and intimate hostility toward the church and reveals his particular irritation with the doctrines of Newman, Keble, and Trench In her explanation of his poetic use of sacramental imagery, especSwinburne and His Gods is the first serious critical analysis to examine the poet s background in the high church in the context of his work Louis clearly shows Swinburne s fierce and intimate hostility toward the church and reveals his particular irritation with the doctrines of Newman, Keble, and Trench In her explanation of his poetic use of sacramental imagery, especially those images connected with the Last Supper, Louis shows how Swinburne s eucharists can be murderous or erotic, aesthetic or republican The demonic parody that characterizes Swinburne s work is shown to have developed through experimentation with neo romantic alternatives to Christianity first through the evocation of a quasi sadistic pessimism, then in the embodiment of the sun god of Art, and, finally, as a feeble gesture toward an unknowable deity which moves elusively both within and beyond the natural world Rather than imposing artificial unity on the poet s career, Louis presents his work as an integrated series of serious and brilliant experiments in Romantic art.
Swinburne and His Gods The Roots and Growth of an Agnostic Poetry Swinburne and His Gods is the first serious critical analysis to examine the poet s background in the high church in the context of his work Louis clearly shows Swinburne s fierce and intimate hostili

  • Title: Swinburne and His Gods: The Roots and Growth of an Agnostic Poetry
  • Author: Margot K. Louis
  • ISBN: 9780773507159
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Swinburne and His Gods: The Roots and Growth of an Agnostic Poetry”

    1. This volume is best read with a collection of Swinburne poems, as there are not complete poems included in the volume, but only excerpts and quotes from his work. As far as introduction to Swinburne goes, this volume serves that purpose well. His satirical works about the Eucharist are explored in detail and the work here gives a very good idea of what Swinburne is about. He is best explained as a transitional Romantic poet, though he is a unique author and poetic force in his own right. It does [...]

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