Days of Valor: An Inside Account of the Bloodiet Six Months of the Vietnam War

In this book the reader enters a nonstop maelstrom of combat action, leaving he or she nearly breathless by the end The human courage and carnage described in these pages resonates through the centuries, from Borodino to the Bulge, but the focus here is on the Vietnam War, and a unique unit formed to take part at its height.The 199th Light Infantry Brigade was created froIn this book the reader enters a nonstop maelstrom of combat action, leaving he or she nearly breathless by the end The human courage and carnage described in these pages resonates through the centuries, from Borodino to the Bulge, but the focus here is on the Vietnam War, and a unique unit formed to take part at its height.The 199th Light Infantry Brigade was created from three U.S infantry battalions of long lineage, as a fast reaction force for the U.S to place in Indochina.As the book begins, in December 1967, the brigade has been in Vietnam for a year, and many of its battered 12 month men are returning home This is timely, as the Communists seem to be in a lull, and the brigade commander, in order to whet his new soldiers to combat, requests a transfer to a active sector, just above Saigon Through January the battalions scour the sector, finding increasing enemy strength, NVA personel now mixed within Viet Cong units But the enemy is lying low, and a truce has even been declared for the Vietnamese New Year, the holiday called Tet On January 30, 1968, the storm breaks loose, as Saigon and nearly every provincial capital in the country is overrun by VC and NVA, bursting in unexpected strength from their base camps In these battles we learn the most intimate details of combat, as the Communists fight with rockets, mortars, Chinese clays, mines, machine guns and AK 47s.The battles evolve into an enemy favoring the cloak of night, the jungle both urban and natural and subterranean fortifications, against U.S forces favoring direct confrontational battle supported by air and artillery When the lines are only 25 yards apart, however, there is little way to distinguish between the firepower or courage of the assailants and the defenders, or even who is who at any given moment, as both sides have the other in direct sight Many of the vividly described figures in this book do not make it to the end.
Days of Valor An Inside Account of the Bloodiet Six Months of the Vietnam War In this book the reader enters a nonstop maelstrom of combat action leaving he or she nearly breathless by the end The human courage and carnage described in these pages resonates through the centuri

  • Title: Days of Valor: An Inside Account of the Bloodiet Six Months of the Vietnam War
  • Author: Robert Tonsetic
  • ISBN: 9781932033526
  • Page: 116
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Days of Valor: An Inside Account of the Bloodiet Six Months of the Vietnam War”

    1. This book is an excellent look at the 1968 Tet Offensive in III Corps taken from a grunts point of view. Having fought in the offensive in I Corps around Hue and Khe Sanh I can attest that the descriptions of the initial confusion, occasional temporary lack of support resources, and determination of the infantry, artillery, and air support are dead on. A good read for anyone who is interested in this era.

    2. Outstanding!Very well written, the level of detail in explaining each sides action was awesome. A very rewarding read. Thank you sir.

    3. Gave up after slogging through Chapter 2, then fast-skimming to see if anything really developed. If it would be at all appropriate to describe a writing style as 'monotone', this is it. I've read textbooks written with more verve. This would be of interest to military historians who want the minutiae of division/regiment/company and the litany of commanding officers listed ad infinitum.To those of us who are interested in the compelling, human stories of this tragic period this book is about as [...]

    4. I made it halfway through this book before giving up. Too much information is included. For example, I appreciate the author's sentiments, but the reader doesn't need to know the name of every casualty. I gained some insights into how the war was fought and learned that the Tet Offensive wasn't completely unexpected, so in that sense, I found the book useful.

    5. This is a detailed Vietnam history book. The author respects and honors each person in the battles, which is good, but it distracts from the story because of how it lacks transition. The author is describing a battle scene and then starts explaining a person's birthplace, military background, etc. and this distracts the reader and the story line path is kind of lost.

    6. Good read, lots of details regarding geography, terrain and other difficulties that our soldier s encountered.At times difficult to read because it was emotionally tryingWould recommend to any history buff . Overall a good read dependent on your interests.

    7. Gsve up on this one a third through. Essentially an extra long AAR with only one map and a very dry writing style that would only be of interest to those who experienced the events covered or serious Vietnam War historians.

    8. This book could have been good. But if I had wanted to read situation reports, I could have gotten them from the Army.

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