Lalla Rookh

1820 Irish poet and friend of Lord Byron and P.B Shelley, Moore s works range from lyric to satire, from prose romance to history and biography Moore was also a good musician and skillful writer of songs, which he set to Irish tunes, mainly of the 18th century Moore s bestselling epic poem, Lalla Rookh, is a kind of miniature Arabian Nights in subject matter, setting a1820 Irish poet and friend of Lord Byron and P.B Shelley, Moore s works range from lyric to satire, from prose romance to history and biography Moore was also a good musician and skillful writer of songs, which he set to Irish tunes, mainly of the 18th century Moore s bestselling epic poem, Lalla Rookh, is a kind of miniature Arabian Nights in subject matter, setting and form The story relates the journey of the princess Lalla Rookh from Delhi to Kashmir, where she is to marry the young King of Bucharia whom she has never met From its first appearance Lalla Rookh inspired the romantic imaginations of artists, dramatists and composers alike with its heady combination of drama, poetry, romance, pathos, fantasy, horror and exoticism See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.
Lalla Rookh Irish poet and friend of Lord Byron and P B Shelley Moore s works range from lyric to satire from prose romance to history and biography Moore was also a good musician and skillful writer of so

  • Title: Lalla Rookh
  • Author: Thomas Moore
  • ISBN: 9781850771487
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Lalla Rookh”

    1. It is kind of hard to imagine that reading a book about the life of famous pacing horse Dan Patch would lead me to poetry, but that is exactly what has happened. I am reading Crazy Good: The True Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America and am learning all sorts of interesting little nuggets of trivia, like the fact that the dam (mother, for you non-horse people) of Dan Patch was "Named for an obscure character in Irish poet Thomas Moore's 1817 epic Lalla Rookh: An Oriental Romance"T [...]

    2. It's difficult to know, at a distance of 200 years, what made this a best seller of its time. The versification is facile enough, and the framing device simple but effective - but the poetry! Moore puts these words into the mouth of one of his characters;"The profusion, indeed, of flowers and birds, which this poet had ready on all occasions, —not to mention dews, gems, etc.—was a most oppressive kind of opulence to his hearers; and had the unlucky effect of giving to his style all the glitt [...]

    3. This is a masterpiece of narrative poetry. It was one of the best-selling books of its day in England, and it's easy to see why. Thomas Moore was a man of learning and wit, and had an ear for smooth and melodious verse. He slaved over "Lalla Rookh" for years, carefully researching its stories and imagery, polishing and polishing the verse, pouring all his learning and philosophy into its pages.It is a cycle of four oriental tales, contained in a broader frame tale. Lalla Rookh is a young indian [...]

    4. A pleasant romp through a mythical East, at least as conceived by the West of the 19th century. Though perhaps no one would call Lalla Rookh a masterpiece, these verses present consistently lovely, and sometimes even stunning, imagery. Moore also impresses in his ability to weave an amazing number of allusions into his tales, taken from legends, literary sources, travelogues, etc. An easy read, except in the occasional use of words unfamiliar to the modern ear, this little book is recommended to [...]

    5. I stumbled across Lalla Rookh while reading Middlemarch by George Eliot. So now that I've been going back through my notes on Middlemarch, I decided to pick it up. I'm surprised that I haven't gotten a hint of it before now. There's a lot of references I'm going to enjoy going back and researching.

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