The Ragged Edge of the World: Encounters at the Frontier Where Modernity, Wildlands, and Indigenous Peoples Me et

A noted environmental writer relives his experiences of how earth s far corners have yielded to or resisted modernity For forty years Eugene Linden has explored global environmental issues in books and for publications ranging from National Geographic and Time to Foreign Affairs Linden s diverse assignments have brought him to ragged edges of the globe, the sites whereA noted environmental writer relives his experiences of how earth s far corners have yielded to or resisted modernity For forty years Eugene Linden has explored global environmental issues in books and for publications ranging from National Geographic and Time to Foreign Affairs Linden s diverse assignments have brought him to ragged edges of the globe, the sites where modernity, tradition, and wildlands collide A money and ideas from the West have seeped into places like Polynesia, the , and the Arctic, Linden has witnessed dramatic transformations Even in the Ndoki, celebrated as the most pristine and isolated rainforest in Congo, the impact of the outside world now intrudes in the form of dust blowing in from the north and loggers encroaching from all other directions In the Ragged Edge of the World, Linden recounts his adventures at this slippery and fast changing frontier Vietnam in 1971 and 1994, New Guinea and Borneo, pygmy forests and Machu Picchu, the Arctic and Antartica, Cuba and Midway Island charting onrushing social and environmental change An elegy for what has been lost and a celebration of those cultures resilient enough to maintain their vibrancy Linden s new book captures the world at a turning point and offers an intimate look at creatures and cultures as they encounter and try to adapt to globalization.
The Ragged Edge of the World Encounters at the Frontier Where Modernity Wildlands and Indigenous Peoples Me et A noted environmental writer relives his experiences of how earth s far corners have yielded to or resisted modernity For forty years Eugene Linden has explored global environmental issues in books an

  • Title: The Ragged Edge of the World: Encounters at the Frontier Where Modernity, Wildlands, and Indigenous Peoples Me et
  • Author: Eugene Linden
  • ISBN: 9780670022519
  • Page: 461
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Ragged Edge of the World: Encounters at the Frontier Where Modernity, Wildlands, and Indigenous Peoples Me et”

    1. The Ragged Edge of the Worldby Eugene Linden4 starspp. 260I once imagined myself as adventurous and thought that I would one day visit the ragged edge of the world. Now I realize that I am quite content at home with my three cats and a book which will take me there and Eugene Linden does a superb job of escorting me around various ragged edges of our planet as New Guinea, Congo, Antarctica, Peru, Borneo and Midway Island.Linden has long been a journalist, beginning in the Vietnam war and since t [...]

    2. Gosh, this book was fabulous. Linden has such an engaging style - like you are just having a casual conversation. Each chapter is an essay that focuses on a location or people group that he has encountered during his long career as a foreign correspondent and journalist. After reading each chapter, I did my own research and further reading he has a way of really piquing the reader's interest to learn more.

    3. Eugene Linden traveled the world on assignments as a journalist. Often times he would learn compelling facts and make observations not on point with his current assignment. He kept these facts and this book is a compilation of these compelling tidbits from the four corners of the globe. First stop Is Borneo. The inhabitants saw all sorts of miraculous items come from the Europeans. However they never could quite believe the (inept) Europeans were the actual creators of these products that came f [...]

    4. One of the best non fiction books I've read. Period. Fascinating, sobering, inspiring. Takes you to amazing corners of the globe and illustrates the people and creatures found in these out of the way places - and how their surroundings are rapidly changing or have been changed. And in the end the author suggests an interesting idea to hopefully curb the loss of these treasures. I will definitely be reading this again.

    5. In The Ragged Edge of the World Eugene Linden (writer and correspondent for Time and National Geographic magazines, among others) describes his travels to remote corners of the globe and his encounters with environmental degradation, habitat destruction, species loss and the pressures of cultural homogenization on traditional populations. The topics are familiar ones for environmentalists: global warming, wolf reintroduction in Yellowstone, the ozone hole, sea ice disintegration and the plight o [...]

    6. In Ragged Edge of the World, Eugene Linden aims to tell the untold stories of his globetrotting adventures as a journalist covering environmental and cultural loss and resilience at the intersection of the modern world and wilderness and the societies that live in the wilderness.The earlier chapters seemed to lack cohesiveness and came off like anecdotes remembered from long-ago adventures, rather than stories with beginnings, ends and meanings. I have a feeling they'd be more enjoyable to a rea [...]

    7. During the late 20th and early 21st century, the indigenous peoples and unspoiled environments of the world have been quickly assimilated and/or decimated by the modern consumer culture. Eugene Linden has spent the past 40 years as a journalist traveling to these wild places at "the ragged edge of the world" to see firsthand and to document the changes in enviroment and culture in these remote areas as the world encroaches upon them. This series of essays serves as a 40-year travelogue of Linden [...]

    8. Though these are the stories that didn't fit into the magazine articles he wrote, Linden can't shed the journalistic-style--when he does, it is less like reading the New York Times and more engaging. Civilization is killing the planet and erasing indigenous cultures worldwide and the places where this happens are the places Linden has traveled during his long career. The anecdotes, facts, encounters, science, and descriptions are often good. These are places--Easter Island, Antarctica, Africa--w [...]

    9. This book is a combination of The Lost City of Z, Edward O. Wilson's The Future of Life and, to a degree, The World Without Us. On one level it is an adventure story about going to those places where 'civilization' meets nature and native peoples. If that is all it was it would still be worth reading, but Linden has a bigger purpose with this book: To really show the impact that we're having on culture and the environment around the world. To this end he succeeds brilliantly. The picture he pain [...]

    10. If Linden ever wrote a bucket list of places to visit, he must surely have done it all twice by now. This is a fascinating study of where modernity and indigenous cultures collide, from the frozen North to the jungles of Cuba (and everywhere in between). The world is at risk of losing indigenous knowledge as more and more people leave behind their tribal life. Its disturbing that we may lose thousands of years of collective knowledge in just a few generations. Linden is sending out a warning tha [...]

    11. The author draws on his remarkable 40-year career as an ecological journalist to tell the (yes, depressing) story of the world's vanishing wildlife and indigenous human cultures. I was able to forgive the book's almost complete disregard of problematic women's issues in many of the places discussed, because of the importance behind the primary message: modern civilization and the consumer society are pushing the planet and its delicate ecosystem of animals (the human animal included) and ecology [...]

    12. An interesting collection of travel essays, focusing on deep forested, undeveloped, raw wilderness regions. The essays focus on conservation efforts in Indonesia, but mostly Africa. The bulk of experience Eugene shares is from travels in Central Africa, the CAR & DROC. A quick, interesting read, good for a college class in conservation. Most of the stories are from the 1990s; more current info would have been nice.

    13. I read a different book than I thought I was going to read. The flap sounded much more travel or government based. The reality is good, but not what I wanted. It was much more environmental, which makes sense for someone who writes for National Geographic and Smithsonian. The text was very well written and flowed really well, which is why I kept reading. Some of the places the author visits are amazing and the details are great. That said, I am not too interested in the wild flora of Vietnam.

    14. Well, then this was a new and interesting take on the way humans have encroached on wildlife, animals and hidden tribes. It was one man's opinion (the author) as he traveled to do some environmental reporting for various publications. I enjoyed reading his thoughts, however, I found many of them a bit outdated as he has been collecting these stories for decades. A good read, all in all, though.

    15. Linden is a noted environmentalist writing about the remote corners of the earth (from the jungles of Vietnam to the Arctic) and the impact of modernity on the native populations. He starts out with surprising biological finds, but goes on to map out the many grievous loses both environmental and cultural and ends with creative global plans. All of it held my attention and interest.

    16. Fully enjoyed getting lost (no pun intended) in this engrossing journey to distant, remote and often-brutal locations - along with Linden's informed commentary on humankind's ongoing impact. Loved getting up early while at camp this past week, when all was still quiet, and sitting with a cup of coffee or two and this fascinating read.

    17. Globe-spanning, yet brief. Puts environmental conservation up from local to global scale. A travelogue that looks with great depth into natural ecosystems in the context of local customs, animal intelligence and human practices. References many other works by the same author and other prominent works throughout the text.

    18. Eugene Linden is amazing. I can't put this down! Every story sucks you in. The book is a collection of vignettes about the places that Linden has traveled and what he has seen there. I highly recommend this to anyone who is interested in culture and the environment.I learned things in this book that weren't even on my radar before. I'm so glad I decided to pick it up.

    19. We get a bit lost in the numerous trips that sometimes barely have a relation to the sub title of this book. I wish rather than being plainly descriptive the author had made an effort to show what could have been and at what point is the tipping point of irreparable cultural and ecological damage is done.

    20. I am completely impressed with this well-written book reflecting on the sociological, environmental, and economical impact of different cultures in this world. For my full review, visit: forumsinebookclub/view

    21. I liked the idea of what this book would be about, but I don't think it was carried off very well. The writing was disjointed and didn't form a cohesive narrative. I think selecting the "encounters" more carefully and a different writing style would have been very successful.

    22. Strong collection of essays about the "edges of the world" that Eugene Linden has visited while working as a journalist.

    23. An excellent overview of disappearing areas of the world. The author describes trips to some of the most endangered areas on the planet - in terms of disappearing flora, fauna, and culture.

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